What Good is the Bible?

“Why would you ask such a question?” you, the reader, might ask of me.

And certainly I don’t mean it in any sense like an atheist or unbeliever might ask it.  It’s not asked in derision nor do I mean any disrespect by asking it.  It’s a question based on the observation that so few professing Christians seem to read the Bible or know very much about what it really says.  They have to look in the table of contents to find Exodus.  You think I’m kidding, but more than once when I was preaching, I’d announce some text off the beaten path and see people having difficulty finding it.  Or since then, heard a preacher say that his text was on page such-and-such of the pew Bible.

So, what good is it – if you never read it?

Why do you believe what you believe – if you never read it?

How do you know you’re on your way to heaven – if you never read it?

Are you willing to trust your eternal destiny to what someone else says the Bible says?

Pastor so-and-so says it.  The TV personality says it.  My church says it.

Really?

Does the Bible say it?

There are people who will knock on your door and say they are witnesses for Jehovah.  They can quote Scripture by the hour.  It’s said that they get a large percent of their converts from “Bible-believing Christians,” because they quote so much Scripture and make it sound so good.

My wife’s grandmother was a Oneness Pentecostal.  She once sent me a tract explaining why they believe that Jesus is the only God.  I counted about 90 Scripture references in the tract.  What I found so fascinating about this tract was that many of the Scriptures they use to “prove” their view of Jesus as all the God there is, these verses are the very same ones Jehovah’s Witnesses use to “prove” that Jesus is only a created being.  You really can’t have it both ways.  BTW, neither of those “ways” is Scriptural.

I wrote her a letter explaining why I didn’t agree with the tract, but some tragedy happened in her family and she never answered.

The devil can quote Scripture.

“I don’t have time to read the Bible.”

And, truly, we live in a very hectic society.  Lots of responsibilities, lots of things to do.  Lots of stuff to check out on YouTube.

Will you eat something today?  Even if it’s only some item containing “mono- and diglycerides, cellulose gum, salt, sodium citrate, tricalcium phosphate, sodium alginate, xanthan gum, malic acid, caramel color, color added, natural flavor, BHT for freshness” (partial list of actual ingredients in an item in our food pantry – but “only 100 calories”.)

Yum.

Probably you will eat today – more than once.

The apostle John, writing to a brother named Gaius, had this prayer for him, Beloved, I pray that you may prosper in all things and be in health, just as your soul prospers,” 3 John 2.

What level of “health” would you and I have if it corresponded to our spiritual health?

Oh, please.  I urge you.  If you don’t have a habit of daily reading the Bible, start today.

Even just a chapter.

There might be something there you need to know.

Yes, I know.  There are a lot of unpronounceable names.  There’s a lot to read.

Kindergarten children don’t start out by reading “War and Peace.”  Actually, I’ve never read it.  They start out with simple stuff and work their way up.

Work your way up.

I can testify that after five decades of reading, I wish I had started earlier and read more.  Even after reading the Bible through a number of times – I quit counting after 50 – I still see new things.  It’s a joy to read through the Bible and meet old friends, so to speak, and to meet new ones as well.  Many of the posts in this blog have come from something I’ve seen reading the Bible.  And I’m conscious that, for all that, I still haven’t been as faithful in reading as I should have been.

Even just a chapter a day.  Half an hour or so.

Not really that much.

My own reading schedule is to read the Bible through once and then go back and read the New Testament again.  I can recommend it.

I’m not trying to boast about my accomplishments or put anyone down who might not “measure up.”

People have died – many people – so that we might have the Bible.  The Savior died, that we might have it to begin with.

Shouldn’t we know as much of it as we can?

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