Voices of Christmas: The Promise

Beginning with this post and going throughout the month of December, Lord willing, we plan to do a series of posts on “the voices of Christmas.”  This will have nothing to do with Santa or Rudolph, but will look at both the Old and New Testaments to see what they might have to say about this time.  It will by no means be an exhaustive look at the season through the eyes of Scripture.  We just want to focus some attention on what it’s really all about.

In Genesis 3:15, the Lord said to Satan, “And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her Seed; He shall bruise your head, and you shall bruise His heel.”

It really struck me for the first time as I was just reading this verse that God gave the first promise of redemption, at least that we have any record of, to the one who made it necessary, namely, the Devil.  I know many refuse to accept the Genesis record as anything more than an allegory or a myth or just the ignorant thinking of primitive people, with no more historical reality or value than Santa himself.  I can’t help that.  Such people probably won’t pay any more attention to what I have to say about it than they do to what the Scripture says about it.

We’re not given a lot of detail about what happened, just enough to know that it did and the results of Adam’s foolish act.  No doubt, Satan thought he had foiled God’s plan for humans.  He knew what happened when one disobeyed God; he’d experienced it himself.  He probably thought that if he could get Adam and Eve to disobey, that God would judge them, as well.  

He was half right.

Satan knew about God’s justice, but he didn’t know anything about God’s grace and mercy.

Adam and Eve did disobey and God did judge them  Adam was given increased labor and so was Eve, although of a different kind.  Their paradise was closed to them and they were thrown out of their home.  We have no record that they ever had fellowship with God like they had enjoyed before their sin.

However, though He judged them, God didn’t disown them, like He had Satan, or destroy them.  He clothed them with coats of skin, thus foreshadowing the truth of redemption: that sinners can only live through the sacrifice of an innocent substitute.

This, then, was the promise to Satan – that instead of destroying God’s purpose, he had simply turned it against himself.  God would do for humanity what He wouldn’t do for angels, namely, provide redemption for them.  Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him who had the power of death, that is, the devil.  …For verily, he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham, Hebrews 2:14, 16 (KJV).  Though Satan would successfully “bruise the heel” of the coming Seed of the woman, that would only serve to “bruise”, or crush, his own head.

In the midst of the shambles and ruin of our first parents’ first sin came also the first promise of redemption:  the first “voice of Christmas”.

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5 thoughts on “Voices of Christmas: The Promise

  1. Beginning December 13th, I will be posting “The Twelve Days of Christmas” The story of Mary and Joseph as told from mondern times, Short paragraph along with a scripture on the real meaning of Christmas. Am enjoying your post on Christmas.
    Greg

  2. This promises to be an interesting series. I look forward to reading the rest!

    I love how you point to the first promise for redemption as the first voice of Christmas. I never thought about it like this. 🙂

    \o/

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