Revelation 7, “In Wrath, Remember Mercy.”

1] After these things I saw four angels standing at the four corners of the earth, holding the four winds of the earth, that the wind should not blow on the earth, on the sea, or on any tree.  2] Then I saw another angel ascending from the east, having the seal of the living God.  And he cried with a loud voice to the four angels to whom it was granted to harm the earth and the sea, 3] saying, “Do not harm the earth, the sea, or the trees till we have sealed the servant of our God on their foreheads.”  4] And I heard the number of those who were sealed  one hundred and forty-four of all the tribes of the children of Israel were sealed:

5] of the tribe of Judah twelve thousand were sealed;
of the tribe of Reuben twelve thousand were sealed;
of the tribe of Gad twelve thousand were sealed;
6] of the tribe of Asher twelve thousand were sealed;
of the tribe of Naphtali twelve thousand were sealed;
of the tribe of Manasseh twelve thousand were sealed;
7] of the tribe of Simeon twelve thousand were sealed:
of the tribe of Levi twelve thousand were sealed;
of the tribe of Issachar twelve thousand were sealed:
8] of the tribe of Zebulun twelve thousand were sealed;
of the tribe of Joseph twelve thousand were sealed;
of the tribe of Benjamin twelve thousand were sealed.

9] After these things I looked, and behold, a great multitude which no one could number, of all nations, tribes, peoples, and tongues, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, with palm branches in their hands, 10] and crying out with a loud voice, saying “Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!”  11] All the angels stood around the throne and the elders and the four living creatures, and fell on their faces before the throne and worshiped God, 12] saying:

“Amen!  Blessing and glory and wisdom,
Thanksgiving and honor and power and might,
Be to our God forever and ever.
Amen.”

13] Then one of the elders answered, saying to me, “Who are these arrayed in white robes, and where did they come from?”

14] And I said to him, “Sir, you know.”

So he said to me, “These are the ones who come out of the great tribulation, and washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.  15] Therefore they are before the throne of God, and serve Him day and night in His temple.  And He who sits on the throne will dwell among them.  16] They shall neither hunger anymore nor thirst anymore; the sun shall not strike them, nor any heat; 17] for the Lamb who is in the midst of the throne will shepherd them and lead them to living fountains of waters.  And God will wipe away every tear from their eyes.”

Our title is found in Habakkuk 3:2, a prayer by the prophet as he was trying to figure out how God could use a wicked nation like the Chaldeans to judge His own people Israel.  Knowing what the Chaldeans did to their victims, he prayed for mercy in the midst of judgment.

Revelation is essentially a book about judgment.  Yet this chapter tells us there is also mercy.

It also gives us one of those behind-the-scenes looks we mentioned earlier and which gave us the title for the series:  “Revelation:  Director’s Cut.”  In the first three verses, we’re introduced to several angels, four angels standing at the four corners of the earth, holding the four winds of the earth, and another angel having the seal of the living God.  There is possibly a second group of four angels to whom it was granted to harm the earth and the sea.  Until just two minutes ago, I believed that these two groups of four were the same; now I’m not so sure.  It doesn’t really matter, there are more than enough angels to go around.

Though unseen, angels have a great deal to do with the providential dealings of God with this world.  Here we see that they even have responsibilities in nature.  The four winds of earth likely refer to the trade winds which continually circle our planet.  As for the four corners of the earth, I’m not so sure.  Even those who believe in a flat earth admit that it’s a circle, though I’ve seen diagrams of a flat rectangle.  Perhaps it refers to the magnetic field of earth.  Perhaps it’s just an expression to tell us that the angels have it covered.  Regardless, that’s not really the point in the chapter.  These angels are kept from harming the earth because something needs to be done first.

Verses 4 through 8 tell us of the “sealing” of the servants of our God on their foreheads, v. 3.  Then there is a listing of one hundred and forty-four thousand of all the tribes of the children of Israel, emphasis added.  Then twelve tribes are listed, with twelve thousand being sealed from each tribe.

The reason we emphasized “the children of Israel” is because there is some discussion as to who these people are.  Some even believe that this portion refers to the church, which they consider to be “spiritual Israel.”  If that’s so, then why does the Spirit go to the trouble of so closely identifying these people as Jews from a particular tribe of the nation of Israel?

In spite of what men say, God is NOT done with the nation.  Though during this present age, they are “set aside” and the church has been given their place of “favor,” though not the promises given to them in the OT, Scripture clearly says that there is coming a time when –

Israel shall blossom and bud,
And fill the face of the world with fruit,
Isaiah 27:6.

Israel shall be saved by the LORD with an everlasting salvation; You shall not be ashamed or disgraced forever and ever,  Isaiah 45:17.

And so all Israel will be saved, Romans 11:26.

With regard to this last verse, it doesn’t mean that every single Jew who ever lived will be saved, but rather that all the Jews who are alive at that particular time will be saved.

Revelation 7:4-8 give us the beginning of that work.

There is something else here.  These elect Jews are said to be sealed on their foreheads, v. 3.  I believe it will be a visible mark, right there for anyone and everyone to see.  There will be no doubt that these are servants of God.  Perhaps this will be the reason for the “mark of the beast” later on.

The rest of the chapter, vs. 9-17, describes a great multitude which no one could number, of all nations, tribes, peoples, and tongues, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, v. 9.  In v. 14, John is told that “these are the one who come out of the great tribulation,” literally, “the tribulation, the great one.”

These who will be willing to die for the Lamb will spend eternity with Him.  The terrible things they endured on earth will be as nothing compared to the blessing they will enjoy in heaven.

Without getting too much into what these faithful believers have to look forward to, I believe there is a great deal for us, as well.

I’m afraid that too often we fall into the attitude of the world regarding death and the hereafter.  Granted that, unlike many in the world, we believe that there is a “hereafter,” but I fear we still fall far short of our views on it.

For example, in a conversation a while back with a brother concerning sickness, he said, “Well, that’s better than the alternative.”  No, it’s not.  Not for the believer.  At the funeral of a dear sister and friend, someone said, “It’s good to be alive.”  My response to that:  “She’s more alive now than she’s ever been.”

I suppose it’s natural to fear death.  It seems like such a final and irrevocable thing.  (If you’ve recently suffered such a bereavement, I’m truly sorry.  I don’t mean to add to your grief).  We don’t even like to say the word “die.”  We say, “So and so passed,” or some other phrase which lessens the impact of the reality of it all.

Apart from Scripture, we have no word about what happens at or after death.  Those who deny Scripture deny the only source of comfort and help at such a time for those left behind, or instruction for those who have gone ahead.

And the Scripture does have something to say about it.

In speaking of his own trials and difficulties, the Apostle Paul wrote,

…[W]e do not lose heart.  Even though our outward man is perishing, yet the inward man is being renewed day by day.  For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, while we do not look at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen. For the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal, 2 Corinthians 4:16-18.

In Romans 8:18-23, he wrote,

For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us.  For the earnest expectation of the creation eagerly waits for the revealing of the sons of God.  For the creation was subjected to futility, not willing, but because of Him who subjected it in hope; because the creation itself also will be delivered form the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God.  For we know that the whole creation groans and labors with birth pangs together until now.  Not only that, but we also who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, eagerly waiting for the adoption, the redemption of our body.

To the church at Corinth, he wrote,

Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; nor does corruption inherit incorruption.  Behold, I tell you a mystery:  We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed – in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet.  For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.  For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality.  So when this corruptible has put on incorruption and this mortal has put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written:   “Death is swallowed up in victory,” 1 Corinthians 15:50-54.

And finally, though there is much more we could say about this,

…I do not want you to be ignorant, brethren,  concerning those who have fallen asleep, lest you sorrow as others who have no hope,  1 Thessalonians 4:13.

Why not, Paul?  Why aren’t we to sorrow in the same way as though who have no hope?  What hope do we have?  And notice that Paul doesn’t say that we’re not supposed to sorrow at all.  We sorrow, but that sorrow is to be mitigated –

For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so God will bring with Him those who sleep in Jesus.

For this we say to you by the word of the Lord, that we who are alive and remain until the coming of the Lord will by no means precede those who are asleep.  For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of an archangel, and with the trumpet of God.  And the dead in Christ will rise first.  Then we who are alive and remain shall be caught up together with him in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air.  And thus we shall always be with the Lord.  Therefore comfort one another with these words, 1 Thessalonians 4:14-18, emphasis added.

“Comfort.”

Death isn’t to be feared; it’s only the door into eternal blessing.

But these words are only for believers.  There is altogether another message for unbelievers, for those who deny Scripture, for those who think it’s all imaginary or just the views of ignorant and uniformed people – those who aren’t really “with it.”

Hebrews 9:27 says, …it is appointed for men once to die, but after this the judgment. 

Even the most vocal opponent of Scripture has to admit the truth of the first part of this verse.  Everyone dies.

However, the verse doesn’t stop there.  Neither does existence…

…after this, the judgment. 

John describes this judgment for us later in Revelation:

And I saw the dead, small and great, standing before God, and books were opened.  And another book was opened, which is the Book of Life.  And the dead were judged according to their works, by the things which were written in the books….  And anyone not found written in the Book of Life was cast into the lake of fire, Revelation 20:11, 12, 15.

“the lake of fire.”

Hell.

I saw something just yesterday that is a classic illustration of what the world thinks about “hell.”  There was a truck delivering a certain brand of beverage.  According to the slogan on the side of the truck, this product “tastes like heaven, burns like hell.”

To many, it’s only a swear word or something to mock.  Others believe it’s just the difficulties of this life.  I had a lady tell me that she thought this life was hell.  Still others will knock at your front door and tell you that it’s just the grave.  If that’s true, then what did the Lord mean when He said, “And I say to you, My friends, do not be afraid of those who kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do.  But I will show you whom you should fear:  Fear Him who, after He has killed, has power to cast into hell; yes, I say to you, fear Him!” Luke 12:4, 5.

“A loving God wouldn’t do that!”

No?

That God is love is certainly taught in Scripture, 1 John 4:8.  Many Christians seem to believe that all that is necessary is to preach the love of God and they’ve preached the Gospel.  However, according to another verse in 1 John, the message is about not the love of God at all.  1 John 1:5 says, this is the message which we have heard from Him and declare to you, that God is light and in Him is no darkness at all.

In the words of Habakkuk 1:13, God is of purer eyes than to behold evil, and cannot look on wickedness.

“This is the message….”

What does this mean?  It means what is the nature and character of this God who is love?

It means that God is holy, righteous and just.  He cannot and will not tolerate sin.  It must be judged.

It means that apart from the Lord Jesus, we’re all sunk.

 

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Revelation 6: Unsealed.

Conquest, vs. 1, 2,

Now I saw when the Lamb opened one of the seals; and I heard one of the four living creatures saying with a loud voice like thunder, “Come and see.” And I looked, and behold, a white horse.  He who sat on it had a bow; and a crown was given to him, and he went out conquering and to conquer.

Violence, vs. 3, 4.

When He opened the second seal, I heard the second living creature saying, “Come and see.”  Another horse, fiery red, went out.  And it was granted to him who sat on it to take peace from the earth, and that people should kill one another; and there was given to him a great sword.

Scarcity, vs. 5,6.

When He opened the third seal, I heard the third living creature say, “Come and see.”  So I looked, and behold, a black horse, and he who sat on it had a pair of scales in his hand.  And I heard a voice in the midst of the four living creatures saying, “A quart of wheat for a denarius, and three quarts of barley for a denarius; and do not harm the oil and the wine.”

Slaughter, vs. 7, 8.

When He opened the fourth seal, I heard the voice of the fourth living creature saying, “Come and see.”  So I looked, and behold, a pale horse.  And the name of him who sat on it was Death, and Hades followed with him.  And power was given to them over a fourth of the earth, to kill with sword, with hunger, with death, and by the beasts of the earth.

Martyrdom, vs. 9-11.

When He opened the fifth seal, I saw under the altar the souls of those who had been slain for the word of God and for the testimony which they held.  And they cried with a loud voice, saying, “How long, O Lord, holy and true, until You judge and avenge our blood on those who dwell on the earth?”  Then a white robe was given to them; and it was said to them that they should rest a little while longer, until both the number of the fellow servants and their brethren, who would be killed as they were, was completed.

Cataclysm, vs. 12-17.

I looked when He opened the sixth seal, and behold, there was a great earthquake; and the sum became black as sackcloth of hair, and the moon became like blood.  And the stars of heaven fell to the earth, as a fig tree drops its late figs when it is shaken by a mighty wind.  Then the sky receded as a scroll when it is rolled up, and every mountain and island was moved out of its place.  And the kings of the earth, the great men, the rich men, the commanders, the mighty men, every slave and every free man, hid themselves in the caves and in the rocks of the mountains, and said to the mountains and rocks, “Fall on us and hide us from the face of Him who sits on the throne and from the wrath of the Lamb!  For the great day of his wrath has come, and who is able to stand?”  (NKJV)

My, there is so much that could be said about this chapter, and the ones following.  There are books and books and books.  If you’re interested in such things, I highly recommend Alva J. McClain’s, The Greatness of the Kingdom.  McClain was one of the founders of Grace Theological Seminary.  Even though it’s a book I read in my youth, it’s still in print.  And because viewpoints tend to be recycled from generation to generation, it’s still relevant.  I suppose, too, that it’s online somewhere.  My son-in-law reminds me of such things.  I do find find online study valuable, but when it’s all said and done, give me a book.  I bought a Strong’s Concordance from a student at the Bible College I attended.  That book made a great “booster seat” for our firstborn son.  Do that with your smartphone!  That was a long time ago, but I still use it, milk stains and all – though not as a booster seat.

Enough of such reminiscences.  What shall we say about this chapter of Revelation?

Some say that these are just generalities, or that they’re always happening.  Some say they’re happening now, in this age.  And to a degree, that may be true.  The one thing Satan desires above all else is to be like God, to be worshiped, Isaiah 14:14; Matthew 4:8, 9; Luke 4:5-7.  Perhaps a good deal of the world’s history has simply been him trying to bring that about.  And I believe that Revelation shows his final and most successful, though ultimately futile, attempt to make that happen.

At the same time, because of v. 17, I don’t believe the particular events in Revelation 6 are happening right now.  Verse 17 says, “the great day of His wrath has come.”   According to 2 Corinthians 6:2, this is the day of salvation, not wrath.  Granted, terrible things are happening right now, and seem to be increasing, but these are simply the results of man’s own rebellion and wickedness.  We’ve pretty much told God to go away, and He’s just letting us reap the results of that.  Cf. Jeremiah 17:10.

One:  Conquest, vs. 1, 2.

Some believe this individual is the Lord Jesus, going forth to conquer the world and to set up His kingdom.  And Revelation 19:1 does describe Him as being on a white horse.  His description there is far different from this man, though, and He is clearly identified, v. 16.  This man is the last of Satan’s efforts to establish a world empire.  Nebuchadnezzar, Alexander, Napoleon, Hitler, Communism, Islam’s goal of subduing the world – as successful as these may have been or might be, all ultimately must fail.  Matthew 24:5-8 give us our Lord’s description of what will happen at the time of the unsealing.

Two:  Conflict, vs. 3, 4.

This will be an unprecedented time of violence.  While there have always been regional strife, national conflict and even “world-wide” wars, this will be a time when peace will be taken from the earth altogether, v. 4.

Three:  Scarcity, vs. 5, 6.

Because of the violence, food will be scarce.  A denarius was about a day’s ordinary wages, so it will take everything a person has to be able to buy what food is available.  Those who are well-off will still be able to get what they need, though, as seen by the instruction not to harm the oil and the wine.  This is not to be seen as a condemnation of the rich, as is becoming common in our day, but simply a fact of life.  Even in the halcyon days of communism, when the shelves of stores were mostly bare for ordinary people, the party elite still lived well.

Four:  Slaughter, vs. 7, 8.

While the effects of the first three seals will likely be world-wide, it does seem that “a fourth of the earth” will be the special focus of the results of these events.  As to which “fourth,” I don’t really want to speculate.  I think these four seals fulfill what our Lord warned of in Matthew 24:4-8, and describe what He called “the beginning of sorrows.”

Five:  Martyrdom, vs. 9-11.

In Matthew 24:9, the Lord prophesied that the time will come when “they will kill you, and you will be hated by all nations for My name’s sake.”  Persecution of God’s people is nothing new.  This will be a time of unusual intensity, however, because, as Revelation 12:12 puts it, the devil knows he has but a short time before it’s all over for him.

Daniel 7:25 has a word about this: Then the saints shall be given into his hand, and then the verse goes on to specify a certain length of time.  Now, Daniel may be referring to the same event as John, or a different event; the thing is the devil can’t touch God’s people unless God gives him permission to do so, cf. Job 1:6-12; 2:1-6.

That’s even indicated here.  The martyrs are assured that it would only be until the number of their fellow servants and their brethren, would be killed as they were, was completed.  There’s only so much the devil and his minions can do, and only so many to whom they can do it.

Six:  Cataclysm:  vs. 12-17.

This earthquake is one of several in the book.  Some think that they all refer to the same event in a sort of reiteration of things throughout the book.  Though I’ve had to change my thinking a little, I think they are separate events.  There’s so much discussion about the book because it is difficult to sort things out.  I expect when all is said and done, more than one thing will be done differently than men said it would be.

At His crucifixion, our Lord turned to ladies who were lamenting His suffering and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for Me, but weep for yourselves and for your children.  For indeed the days are coming in which they will say, ‘Blessed are the barren….  Then they will begin to say to the mountains, ‘Fall on us!’ and to the hills, ‘Cover us!’ ”  Luke 23:28-30.

Not forever will this world thumb its nose at its Creator.  One of these days, we’re going to run into the end of God’s patience, and we’ll see His wrath poured on this wicked world.

In Revelation 5:6, John saw a Lamb as though it has been slain.  There is only one way of escape from the judgment of God.  That’s not to deny it, as many do today, but to receive by faith the One who bore that judgment for sinners.

Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved, Acts 16:31.

Revelation 5:4-14, “Worthy is the Lamb!”

So I wept much because no one was found worthy to open and read the scroll, nor to look at it.  But one of the elders said to me, “Do not weep.  Behold, the Lion of the tribe of Judah, the Root of David, has prevailed to open the scroll and to loose its seven seals.”

And I looked, and behold, in the midst of the throne and of the four living creatures, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb as though it had been slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God sent out into all the earth.  Then He came and took the scroll out of the right hand of Him who sat on the throne.

Now when He had taken the scroll, the four living creatures and the twenty-four elders fell down before the Lamb, each having a harp, and golden bowls full of incense, which are the prayers of the saints.  And they sang a new song, saying:

“You are worthy to take the scroll,
And to open its seals;
For You were slain,
And have redeemed us to God by Your blood
Out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation,
And have made us kings and priests to our God;
And we shall reign on the earth,”

Then I looked, and I heard the voice of many angels around the throne, the living creatures, and the elders; and the number of them was ten thousand times times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands, saying with a loud voice:

“Worthy is the Lamb who was slain,
To receive power and riches and wisdom,
And strength and honor and glory and blessing!”

And every creature which is in heaven and on the earth and under the earth and such as are in the sea, and all that are in them, I heard saying:

“Blessing and honor and glory and power
Be to Him who sits on the throne,
And to the Lamb, forever and ever!”

Then the four living creatures said, “Amen!”  And the twenty-four elders fell down and worshiped Him who lives forever and forever.   (NKJV)

As I read over this chapter gathering thoughts about it, chills ran up and down my spine as I contemplated the grandeur and majesty of this “worship service.”  I’m afraid ours pale in comparison with it.

But something else, first.

In the earlier part of the chapter, John had “wept much” because no one was worthy to take the scroll from the hand of the One on the throne and open it.  No one deserved even to look at it, let alone read it!

But one of the elders said, “Wait.  There is One.

“Behold, the Lion of the tribe of Judah, the Root of David, has prevailed to open the scroll and to loose its seals,”  v. 5.

“The Lion of the tribe of Judah.”  This takes us back to Jacob’s dying declaration to his sons in Genesis 49:9, 10, where he says,

“Judah is a lion’s whelp;
From the prey, my son, you have gone up.
He bows down, he lies down as a lion;
And as a lion, who shall rouse him?
The sceptre shall not depart from Judah,
Nor a lawgiver from between his feet,
Until Shiloh comes:
And to Him shall be the obedience of the people.”

“The Root of David.”

This takes us back to Isaiah 11:1, 10:

There shall come forth a Rod from the stem of Jesse,
And a Branch shall grow out of his roots….

And in that day there shall be a Root of Jesse,
Who shall stand as a banner to the people;
For the Gentiles shall seek Him,
And His resting place shall be glorious.

The rest of Isaiah 11 is wonderful and its thoughts are continued in ch. 12.  You should read them, though, for now, we’re only interested in the two verses.

Surely the elder talking to John portrays a mighty warrior, a prince among his people.  So John turns to see this person, and he sees –

a Lamb.

That most inoffensive and defenseless of creatures – a lamb.

True, the symbols of “horns” and “eyes” speak of strength and knowledge, but, still, a lamb.

But that’s not all.  John saw –

A Lamb as though it had been slain.

“As though” –

Not dead, alive, though bearing the marks of death.

And the elder has one more thing to say about this Lamb:  He has prevailed to open the book and to loose its seven seals,” v. 5.

You see, there is where it all starts, if you and I aren’t just simply to be condemned to hell because of our sins.

It isn’t enough just to have the Jesus of much of modern thought, or of other religions, or even much of what calls itself Christianity.  He wasn’t just a prophet or teacher, though He was that.  He wasn’t just a good example, because that would do us no good.  We could never follow His example.  And, contrary to some skepticism and unbelief, He did exist.  He’s not just a figment of some misguided imagination.  And He’s not just our buddy.

Scripture says that He came to be a Savior.  The angel told Joseph, “He shall save His people from their sins,” Matthew 1:21.  Now it’s true that the angel said to His mother that He “will reign over the house of Jacob forever,” Luke 1:33, but that “house” itself needs to be saved from sin.  The Cross had to come first.  He had to be the slain Lamb before He could be the sovereign Lord.

Without His death, there would be no salvation, no blessing, no grace.

But He didn’t just die; He “prevailed.”

He won.

He rose from the dead, evidence, to us,  that God accepted His death as the payment for sin.  Without the Resurrection, we’d have no way of knowing if His death was any different than the others who died with Him that day.  He ascended into Heaven, to sit at the right hand of the Majesty on high, waiting for the fulfillment of the promises the Father made to Him.

Without that, a lot of the rest of the chapter wouldn’t be possible.

This brings us to the “chills”.

I love good music.  Handel’s Messiah.  The 1812 Overture.  Music like that, that doesn’t require an amplifier to be effective.  And that actually is music, and not just an assortment of notes accompanied by theatrics.  Those crescendos up to the climax….  I love them.

Read the chapter over again.  That crescendo of praise and worship.

The living creatures and the twenty-four elders, v. 8.

The voice of many angels around the throne, the living creatures, and the elders; and the number of them was ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands, v. 11.

And every creature which is in heaven and on the earth and under the earth and such as are in the sea, and all that are in them, v. 13.

The whole of creation raises its voice in a crescendo of praise to its Creator and Redeemer, for even creation itself will be redeemed from the curse brought on it by our first parents, Romans 8:21.  How much more, then, ought you and I, who have been released from the bondage and curse of sin, raise our voices in praise to Him who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb, forever and forever.

Hallelujah.

Revelation 5:1-3, “Who Is Worthy?”

And I saw on the right hand of Him who sat on the throne a scroll written inside and on the back, sealed with seven seals.  Then I saw a strong angel proclaiming with a loud voice, “Who is worthy to open the scroll and to loose its seals?”  And no one in heaven or on earth or under the earth was able to open the book, or to look at it.
So I wept much, because no one was found worthy to open and read the scroll, or to look at it.    

John has been caught up into heaven, ch. 4, and has described something of what He saw of a throne and One who sat on it.  Now He describes that glorious Being as holding a scroll in His right hand, a scroll sealed with seven seals.  Then he hears a strong angel proclaiming with a loud voice, “Who is worthy to open the scroll and to loose its seals?” 

No problem, surely.

After all, look at all man has accomplished, how much he has learned of himself and the world in which he lives.  No doubt there is at least one who is worthy, who deserves, who is able, to take the scroll and open it.

Then there are angels!  Far mightier than men.  Perhaps one of them….

Not so.

And no one in heaven or on earth or under the earth was able to open the scroll, or to look at it, v. 3.

Do you see it?

The scroll lies open on the hand of God, the word is sent out for one is worthy, who deserves, to take that scroll and open it.

And there is silence.

No one in heaven or on earth or under the earth is able to open the scroll, or to look at it (!) emphasis added.

Do you really see that?

There’s not a single person anywhere who is worthy even to look at the scroll, let alone open it.

I wonder what this says about our careless and loose approach to spiritual things, to the Word of God.  That scroll only deals with a little bit of God’s purpose for this world and no one was worthy enough to open it.  Scripture tells us a great deal more about God and His dealings with us, and yet how few read or treasure it.

You see, we don’t deserve to have the Bible.  God could simply have abandoned Adam and Eve when they turned away from Him there in the Garden.  He didn’t.

And we too often follow in the footsteps of our first parents.  So does this world.  I’ve read that there are some 51 countries where the Bible is forbidden.  Even in our own country, it’s illegal in government and school.  And God allows us to reap the results of that rebellion and sin.  Every day, we see the consequences of that on TV and in the papers.

Therefore, if we have the Scripture, how we ought to treasure it!  I’m afraid our dusty and neglected Bibles will have much to say against us at the Judgment.

There used to be a TV show that promised to open “a world of endless wonder!”  What was not really true of the TV show is true of the Bible.  It opens up a panorama of eternal wonder.

But we’ll never see that wonder if we never get into the Book!

Oh, that this New Year might be The Year of the Book!