About vonhonnauldt

I'm just an old guy, married to my amazing wife for more than 47 years. We have five children and nine grandchildren. No dogs or cats or fish. Just us two. Sorry about the no picture. Ran out of cameras :) I love to read and teach the Word of God. There's always something new, even in the difficult chapters. Thanks for stopping by. Come visit us at nightlightblogdotcom. We pray God's best for you.

Acts 6:1-7, The Seven.

Now in those days, when the number of the disciples was multiplying, there arose a complaint against the Hebrews by the Hellenists, because their widows were neglected in the daily distribution.  2] The the twelve summoned the multitude of the disciples and said, “It is not desirable that we should leave the word of God and serve tables.  3] Therefore, brethren, seek out from among you seven men of good reputation, full of the Holy Spirit and wisdom, whom we may appoint over this business; 4] but we will give ourselves continually to prayer and to the ministry of the word.”

5] And the saying pleased the whole multitude.  And they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and the Holy Spirit, and Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Parmenas, and Nicolas, a proselyte from Antioch, 6] whom they set before the apostles; and when they had prayed, they laid hands on them.

7] Then the word of God spread, and the number of the disciples multiplied greatly in Jerusalem, and a great many of the priests were obedient to the faith.  (NKJV)

This is the last reference to the communal sharing of the early church.  Though things may have changed since then, there are still several references in the NT outlining the responsibility of Christians to show compassion and charity, cf. Acts 11:27-30.  At the same time, there is no Scriptural support the idea that the communalism of the early church is to be the pattern for the churches.  It did not work, as we see in our text.  Cultural differences had not been erased and we are not sure they are supposed to be.  The purpose of preaching is not to impose Western culture on other peoples, but to bring them to repentance and faith in the Lord Jesus.  One of the earliest missionaries, Hudson Taylor, was greatly criticized because he understood this.  He adopted the dress and the customs of the Chinese among whom he served, even to the pigtail the men wore.

There were two groups in the early church, the “Hebrews” and the “Hellenists.”  The Hellenists were Jews who had, to varying degrees, adopted Greek customs and the Greek language.  The Hebrews were Jews who refused all such doings and who steadfastly clung to their own traditions and heritage.  Naturally, there were tensions between the two groups, which crept, perhaps unconsciously, into the church.

The Apostles’ responsibilities were great and they could not personally take care of the situation, 6:2-4.  So, seven men were chosen who would be able to oversee the fair  distribution of aid to those who needed it.  Too many preachers are involved in secondary matters in their churches.  Perhaps this can’t be avoided in smaller churches, but the preparation of sermons and lessons, and of the preacher himself, is a matter of great, even eternal, importance.  If at all possible, nothing should be allowed to interfere with that.

There is some discussion as to whether these seven were “deacons.”  Perhaps they were, but they are not so named.  The Greek word itself is one of several which mean, “servant.”  There is no evidence that these men were given any authority anywhere else, or even in this matter.  The phrase, “whom we [that is, the apostles] may appoint over this,” seems to indicate this.  Certainly, there was no authority over the church itself, much less over the apostles.  Whatever they were, some of the seven later rose to greater usefulness, as Stephen and Philip.

Whether these men were deacons or not, to be a deacon is a good thing, 1 Timothy 3:13.  Sadly, the diaconate has been greatly corrupted and perverted by men like Diotrephes, 3 John 9, who like and seek preeminence in the assembly.  By no means is this to say that all deacons are “bad,” nor all elders “good,” but “office” in the assembly is not a place of superiority, the phrase, “to rule” notwithstanding, but of service to it.

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Acts 5:40-42: Shame.

40] And they agreed with him, and when they had called for the apostles and beaten them, they commanded that they should not speak in the name of Jesus, and let them go.  41] So they departed from the presence of the council, rejoicing that they were counted worthy to suffer shame for His name.  42] And daily in the temple, and in every house, they did not cease teaching and preaching Jesus as the Christ.  (NKJV)

Though there is a lot in these verses, we want to focus on the middle verse in this post.

For a while, I didn’t really know how to approach these verses. The Bible does have a lot to say on the subject of “shame”, how the wicked don’t have any or that they revel in things they ought to be ashamed of, and many other things as well.

In my reading the other day, I came across Mark 8:38, where our Lord says, “Whoever is ashamed of Me and My words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of him the Son of Man also will be ashamed when He comes in the glory of His Father with the holy angels,” also Luke 9:26.

This got me to thinking.  This led me to Hebrews 12:1, 2,Therefore we also, since we are surrounded by so great of cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which so easily ensnares us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith, who for the joy that was set before Him, endured the cross, despising the shame, and has sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.

“despising the shame.”

In our superficial and sentimental Christianity, we have such a sanitized and inadequate view of the death of Christ on the cross.  Our pictures and icons show pretty much a bloodless Christ, modestly covered.  The real thing was far different.  Without meaning to minimize the horror of that event, our Lord was a bloody mess.  Scripture tells us His face was almost unrecognizable, Isaiah 52:14.  He had been whipped with a Roman flagellum, a thing made of leather cords in which were embedded bits of bone.  Contemporary accounts of such things tell us that the ribs became visible and that many died from this alone, before they ever got to a cross.  If they did make it that far, there was no modest covering.

No, my friends, it is not without meaning that Hebrews tells us that the Lord Jesus endured the Cross.  We cannot even begin to imagine what He suffered for those for whom He died.  And this doesn’t count what He suffered on account of sin as the wrath of God was poured out on Him.  We read of no cry for His physical suffering, only for His abandonment by the Father:  “Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani?”  – “My God, My God, Why have You forsaken Me?”  There was no profanity in that cry, as it is too often when we use God’s name.  That was the cry of One who had never ever before experienced separation from the Father. 

That cry should echo and reverbrate through our beings to remind us of the agony the Savior was willing to endure to rescue people like us from our sins.

But Scripture also tells us He “despised” the shame of hanging there open to view.  I don’t even really know how to write about that.  The shame of public exposure, of being condemned as a criminal, of being executed – though He died of His own will, not that of the Romans.

But there is something else of which Scripture tells us that the Lord Jesus will be ashamed.  We quoted the verse earlier in this post:  “Whoever is ashamed of Me and My words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of him also will the Son of Man be ashamed when He comes in the glory of His Father with the holy angels,” emphasis added.

I don’t want to minimize this in any way, but perhaps the word carries an idea of “embarrassment.”  We think of the Return of Christ as a joyous time, a time of being reunited with our loved ones, of meeting other brothers and sisters in Christ, of being done with this wicked world and our own lives, which are too often marred by failure and heartache, of seeing our Lord.  And those things will be true, far more than we can realize.  We will be able to worship and serve Him as He deserves – without the hindrances of our fallen natures.

But there will also be a time of judgment,  Romans 14:10; 2 Corinthians 5:9, 10.

In 2 Corinthians 5:11, Paul used the word “phobos,” which the NKJV translates as “terror,” in describing how we should view standing before the judgment seat of Christ.  We get our word “phobia” from that word.  I don’t think that Paul had our definition in mind when he wrote, but perhaps it ought to make us stop and think a little about the idea of standing before the holy and righteous Creator of the universe to give an account of the years He gives us on this planet.

Acts 5:33-39, The Battle That Can’t Be Won

33] When they heard this, they were furious and plotted to kill them.  34] Then one in the council stood up, a Pharisee named Gamaliel, a teacher of the law held in respect by all the people, and commanded to put the apostles outside for a little while.  35] And he said to them, “Men of Israel, take heed to yourselves what you intend to do regarding these men.  36] For some time ago Theudas rose up, claiming to be somebody.  A number of men, about four hundred, joined him.  He was slain, and all who obeyed him were dispersed.  37] After this man, Judas of Galilee rose up in the days of the census, and drew away many people after him.  He also perished, and all who obeyed him were dispersed.  38] And now I say to you, keep away from these men and let them alone; for if this plan or this work is of men, it will come to nothing; 39] But if it is of God, you cannot overthrow it – lest you even be found to fight against God.”

The Scripture for this post follows the apostles’ brave assertion that “we ought to obey God rather than men,” v. 29, and gives us the reaction of the nation’s spiritual leaders.  Instead of repenting, they became furious – often the reaction when error is confronted by truth – and wanted to kill the apostles, only being prevented from this by the counsel of Gamaliel, a Pharisee.  The leaders of the council were all Sadduccees, who believed nothing about the supernatural.  As a Pharisee, Gabriel would have believed in such things.  We read of several Pharisees who were saved, Saul of Tarsus [a student of Gamaliel] notable among them, but there are no records of Sadduccees ever being converted.

Recounting some historical incidents of men who had rebelled and had been defeated, Gamaliel warned the council, saying, “keep away from these men and let them alone; for if this plan or this work is of men, it will come to nothing; but if it of God, you cannot overthrow it – lest you even be found to  fight against God, vs. 38, 39.

“If it is of God, you cannot overthrow it….”

There is no further record of Gabriel, so we don’t know if he became a follower of Jesus of Nazareth, but he had a higher view of God than many who do claim to follow Him.  In no way do I deny the responsibility of men to obey God; what I do deny is that their rebellion and sin in any way defeats or derails the purpose of God for this wicked world – or for them.

This is not fatalism – that it doesn’t matter what we do.  It does matter.

We live in perilous times.  I’m afraid they’re going to get worse.  Scripture says that men’s hearts will fail them because of the fearfulness of what they see, Luke 21:26.  That verse probably doesn’t refer to this particular day of this year, but it will happen one day.  The point is, Christians and unbelievers alike get so wrapped up in the happenings of this world that they forget about the next.  Granted, unbelievers likely don’t believe in “next,” but Christians sometimes forget it, as well.

If I read The Revelation correctly, there is coming a terrible time in which the Devil will apparently have free reign and he will do everything he can to subvert and destroy mankind.  However, he and all those who follow him will find out, sooner or later, that you cannot win when you fight against God.

Acts 5:30-32, A Prince and Savior.

30] “The God of our fathers raised up Jesus whom you murdered by hanging on a tree.  31] Him God has exalted to His right hand to be Prince and Savior, to give repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins.  32] And we are His witnesses to these things, and so also in the Holy Spirit whom God has given to them who obey Him.”

The thing we’re interested in in this portion of Scripture is what Peter says about what happened to the Lord Jesus after His resurrection:  God exalted Him to His own right hand.  The question is, what is He doing there right now?  Not “doing there” as if there were some question about His right to be there, but rather, what are His activities there?

A common view is that He is ruling His church as its Head.

Is that what the Scripture teaches?

Our Scripture tells us He is “Prince and Savior, to give repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins” (emphasis added).  We emphasized “to Israel” because a common view is that God is done with Israel, that their crucifixion of Jesus forever closed the door to them, that the church has taken her place as “spiritual Israel,” and, ultimately, the Old Testament prophets didn’t really mean Israel when they said, for example, Israel shall blossom and bud, and fill the face of the world with fruit, Isaiah 27:6.

It is true that Israel as a nation has been set aside in this age, but Scripture says that is only until the fullness of the Gentiles has come in, Romans 11:25, (emphasis added.)  Earlier in the chapter, Paul wrote, I say then, have they stumbled that they should fall?  Certainly not!  But through their fall, to provoke them to jealousy, salvation has come to the Gentiles.  Now if their fall is riches for the world, and their failure riches for the Gentiles, how much more their fullness! Romans 11:11, 12.  Though I’ve seen it done, you can’t really say that “their fall” and “their failure” refer to Israel without also saying that “their fullness” refers to Israel.

“Their fullness.”

What is that?

Instead of the crucifixion cutting them off from God’s grace, it is through that very thing that they will be brought to the feet of the Crucified One.  Zechariah 12:10, 11 quotes God as saying, “And I will pour on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem the Spirit of grace and supplication; they will look on Me whom they pierced. Yes, they will mourn for Him as one grieves for his only son, and grieve for Him as one grieves for a firstborn.  In that day there shall be a great mourning in Jerusalem.”  John quotes part of this verse at the Crucifixion, John 19:37.

Just in passing, Zechariah quotes “the word of the LORD” in this portion, the word “LORD” being capitalized refers to Jehovah, and yet it is He Who is crucified.  This is just one of many incidental references in the Old Testament that demonstrate that Jesus is Jehovah.  He wasn’t just a Man born illegitimately to a peasant girl in Israel, but was God Incarnate.

God is not done with Israel.  Though Zechariah 14 describes a terrible time for her just before the Lord returns, yet He will return and claim her for Himself.  Zechariah 13:1 says, “In that day a fountain shall be opened for the house of David and for the inhabitants of Jerusalem, for sin and for uncleanness.”

But our Lord won’t just come back as Savior.  Peter says He will come back as Prince, or Ruler.  Perhaps Revelation 20:4 is the best known verse about this:  And they lived and reigned with Christ for a thousand years.”  Leaving aside the uproar about “the Millennium,” except to say that the Holy Spirit inspired John to use that phrase five times in six verses for some reason, perhaps to indicate that He meant “1,000 years,” this isn’t the only verse to refer to our Lord as King.  In giving a further description of our Lord’s return, Revelation 19:14-15a say this:  And the armies of heaven, clothed in fine linen, white and clean, followed Him on white horses.  Now out of His mouth goes a sharp sword, that with it He should strike the nations.  And He Himself shall rule them [the nations] with a rod of iron.  

Zechariah 14 gives us a little idea of this “rod of iron.”  It says, And it shall come to pass that everyone who is left of all the nations which came against Jerusalem shall go up from year to year to worship the King, the LORD of hosts, and to keep the Feast of Tabernacles.  And it shall come to pass that whichever of the families of the earth do not come up to Jerusalem to worship the King, the LORD of hosts, on them there shall be no rain.  If the family of Egypt will not come up and enter in, they shall have no rain; they shall receive the plague with which the LORD strikes the nations who do not come up to keep the Feast of Tabernacles.  This shall be the punishment of Egypt and the punishment of all the nations that do not come up to keep the Feast of Tabernacles, vs. 16-19.

And Matthew says, The Son of Man will send His angels, and they will gather out of His kingdom all things that offend, and those who practice lawlessness, and will cast them into the furnace of fire.  There will be wailing and gnashing of teeth, Matthew 13:41, 42.

There will be no “diversity,” no “freedom of religion.”  Everything will be in accord with the Word and will of God, to “saved” and “unsaved” alike.  That is why Satan will be able to get together people against the Lord, whose number is as the sand of the sea, Revelation 20:7.  This will forever answer those who say that people go wrong because of education or environment or economic conditions.  Conditions will be the best they have been since the Garden of Eden and people will still rebel against God.

Acts 5:29, Of God or Men?

29] But Peter and the other apostles answered and said:  “We ought to obey God rather than men.

I originally listed several more verses, but got to thinking this verse might be a good motto for the New Year.  I have no idea what 2018 will bring, but whatever it is, God knows all about it and it’s in His purpose.  We live in uncertain times when the ungodly are doing all they can to get rid of any idea of God.  We see the results of that in the chaos recorded in the news.  Regardless of all that, may it be our desire and prayer in this year to obey God rather than men if that choice must be made.

Acts 5:12-28: In Trouble Again

12] And through the hands of the apostles many signs and wonders were done among the people. And they were all with one accord in Solomon’s porch.  13] Yet none of the rest dared join them, but the people esteemed them highly.  14] And believers were increasingly added to the Lord, multitudes of both men and women, 15] so that they brought the sick out into the streets and laid them on beds and couches, that at least the shadow of Peter passing by might fall on some of them.  16] Also a multitude gathered from the surrounding cities to Jerusalem, bringing sick people and those who were tormented by unclean spirits, and they were all healed.

17] Then the high priest rose up, and all those who were with him (which is the sect of the Sadduccees), and they were filled with indignation, 18] and laid their hands on the apostles and put them in the common prison.  19] But at night an angel of the Lord opened the prison doors and brought them out, and said, 20] “Go, stand in the temple and speak to the people all the words of this life.”

21] And when they heard that, the entered the temple early in the morning and taught. But the high priest and those with him came and called the council together, with all the elders of the children of Israel, and sent to the prison to have them brought.

22] But when the officers came and did not find them in the prison, they returned and reported, 23] “Indeed we found the prison shut securely, and the guards standing outside before the doors; but when we opened them, we found no one inside!” 24] Now when the high priest, the captain of the temple, and the chief priests heard these things, they wondered what the outcome might be. 25] So one came and told them, saying, “Look, the men whom you put in prison are standing in the temple and teaching the people!”

26] Then the captain went with the officers and brought them without violence, for they feared the people, lest they should be stoned. 27] And when they had brought them, they set them before the council. And the high priest asked them, 28] saying, “Did we not strictly command you not to teach in this name? And look, you have filled Jerusalem with your doctrine, and intend to bring this Man’s blood on us!”  (NKJV)

This portion seems like deja vu all over again.  Sometimes, instead of going away, trouble just gets worse.  This time, all the apostles were arrested.  However, God was pleased to intervene and the men were freed from their imprisonment, vs. 17-20.  They were told to resume their preaching.  Circumstances do not change responsibility.

We can well imagine the shock, astonishment and frustration caused by this deliverance.  To all appearances, everything was normal.  Gates were closed and locked; guards were at their stations, but “there was no one inside!” v. 23.

While the officials were pondering this unexpected turn of events, someone came and told them that the escaped prisoners were “standing in the temple and teaching the people!” v, 25.

Arrested once more, but peacefully because the people held them in high esteem, v. 26, the apostles were brought before the council.  The high priest reminded them that they had been commanded not to teach in the name of Jesus of Nazareth, but, instead of obeying that injunction, the apostles had “filled” Jerusalem with their doctrine.  This is described in vs. 14-16.  He then blamed them for trying to fix the blame for the death of Jesus on him and his fellows.  By this, we see that he totally missed the point of the apostles’ preaching.  It wasn’t about assigning “blame” at all, but about revealing the purpose of that death, which was “to bring repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins,” v. 32.

People today still “miss the point.”  As I write these words, we’re in the middle of the Christmas season, with all its festivities and frivolity.  But in the midst of all that, with the exception of an occasional Christmas carol or maybe a nativity scene tucked in among all the decorations, there is still no room for the Lord Jesus.