Acts 4:1-4, The First, But Not the Last.

1] Now as they spoke to the people, the priests, the captain of the temple, and the Sadducees came upon them, 2] being greatly disturbed that they taught the people and preached in Jesus the resurrection from the dead.  3] And they laid hands on them, and put them into custody until the next day, for it was already evening.  4] However, many of those who heard the word believed; and the number of the men came to be about five thousand.

The chapter continues from chapter 3 and gives a second result of the Peter’s sermon beside the conversion of about five thousand men:  he and the disciples get arrested.  The chapter may be divided into three sections:  their detention, vs. 1-4, their defense, vs. 5-20, and their dismissal, vs. 21-23.
The title of the post refers to the arrest described in our verses.  It was the first arrest in the history of the church, but it certainly was not the last.

1. The Captors, the priests, the captain of the temple and the Sadducees, v. 1.
The priests were responsible for procedures for the offerings and sacrifices brought into the Temple.  The captain of the temple was what we might call “the head of security.”  The Sadducees were the liberal wing of Israel’s leadership and, as Matthew 22:23 and Acts 23:8 tell us, say there is not resurrection – and no angel or spirit.  The Pharisees were the conservatives and believed in both the resurrection and angels.  Paul turned that difference to his advantage in one of his trials, Acts 23:6.  There was a third party, “the Herodians,” who, to one degree or another, allied themselves with Rome.  Perhaps they thought, “If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em.”

2. The Controversy, v. 2.
There were two things which bothered these officials:
a. they taught the people.
This may seem strange to us, but we shouldn’t overlook it.  The attitude of these leaders, along with the Pharisees, was one of disdain and contempt for the “little people,” John 7:45-49, as well as any idea that any but themselves should “teach the people.”  They were the spiritual leaders of the nation.  The common people might listen to this interloper into the spiritual affairs of the nation, but they themselves were far above such things.  It’s interesting that while we do read of Pharisees who came to the Lord, Paul being the notable example, there is no record of any Sadducee doing so.
Sadly, that attitude is still around.  In my own experience, I’ve heard a seminary graduate lament that “you can’t really teach much at the ‘Sunday School’ level,” and another brother, looking forward to teaching in a “Bible Institute,” rejoiced that now he would really have to study for “those” people because the folks in the church he was pastoring didn’t require much study or preparation(!)  And, yes, I really did hear these men make those statements.
I recognize the need for advance training for some, to counter the unbelief and skepticism of so-called “higher education” in our day, although the early church did alright without it, and do not necessarily say that we should do away with seminaries and such.  I do deny that “the church” is in any way inferior to the seminary.  The local church was intended to be the center of evangelism, and  instruction, to raise up faithful men, who will be able to teach others also, 2 TImothy 2:2; Matthew 28:18-20.  There is no provision in Scripture for the numerous “para-church” organizations which have sprung up.  In fact, I believe that disregard of this Biblical principle has led to the deplorable and apostate condition of much of “Christianity” today.
b.  they preached in Jesus the resurrection from the dead.
For the Sadducees, at least, this was the disciples’ main offense.  Not only were Peter and John teaching people these men thought to be incapable of learning, they were preaching heresy!  It seems from the phrasing that they weren’t just proclaiming the resurrection of Jesus, but through Him the resurrection of everyone, as Paul later taught 1 Corinthians 15.
The Resurrection of our Lord was the message of the early church, Acts 1:22; 2:31; 4:2, 33; 17:18, 32; 24:15, 21.  As Paul put it in 1 Corinthians 15:17, 19, If Christ is not risen from the dead, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins!  If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men the most pitiable.  If there is no resurrection, the sin question has not been answered.  Scripture has firmly established that there is an “after” as far as death is concerned, that it is not the end of our existence, and that much of what happens in this life will not bear fruit until then:  Some men’s sins are clearly evident, preceding them to judgment, but those of some men follow later.  Likewise, the good works of some are clearly evident, and those that are otherwise cannot be hidden, 1 Timothy 5:24-25.
Death might come as an interruption to this life, but really, it is only an intermission, as it were, between two acts:
But I do not want you to be ignorant, brethren concerning those who have fallen asleep, lest you sorrow as others who have no hope.  For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so God will bring with Him those who sleep in Jesus.
For this we say to you by the word of the Lord, that we who are alive and remain until the coming of the Lord will by no means precede those who are asleep.  For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of an archangel, and with the trumpet of God.  And the dead in Christ will rise first.  Then we who are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air.  And thus we shall always be with the Lord.  Therefore comfort one another with these words, 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.  

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Acts 2:24-36, “…God Disposes.”

24] “whom God raised up, having loosed the pains of death, because it was not possible that He should be held by it.  25] For David says concerning Him:

‘I foresaw the LORD always before my face,
For He is at my right hand, that I may not be shaken.
26] Therefore my heart rejoiced, and my tongue was glad;
Moreover my flesh also will rest in hope.
27] For You will not leave my soul in Hades,
Nor will you allow Your Holy One to see corruption.
28] You have made known to me the ways of life;
You will make me full of joy in Your presence.’

29] “Men and brethren, let me speak freely to you of the patriarch David, that he is both dead and buried, and his tomb is with us to this day.  30] Therefore, being a prophet, and knowing that God has sworn with an oath to him that of the fruit of his body, according to the flesh, He would raise up the Christ to sit on his throne, 31] he, foreseeing this, spoke of the resurrection of the Christ, that His soul was not left in Hades, nor did His flesh see corruption.  32] This Jesus God has raised up, of which we are all witnesses.  33] Therefore being exalted to the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, He poured out this which you now see and hear.

34] “For David did not ascend into the heavens, but he says himself:

‘The LORD said to my Lord,
“Sit at My right hand,
35] Till I make Your enemies Your footstool.’ “

36] “Therefore let all the house of Israel know assuredly that God has made this Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Christ.”  (NKJV)

One of the Scriptures for our last post was Acts 2:23, where Peter has accused his audience that they “by lawless hands, [had] crucified, and put to death” the Lord Jesus, even though it had been evident that His was no ordinary life.

Perhaps the religious leaders who were behind the crucifixion of our Lord rubbed their hands in glee at the idea that finally they were rid of this One who had been a thorn in their sides for three or more years.  Little did they know!  John 11:48 reveals some of their reasoning; they were concerned for their own prestige and power in the nation.  The “removal” of Jesus of Nazareth was considered necessary for the preservation of these things.  And for a few days, it seemed they were right.

However, God’s purpose concerning Christ is an eternal purpose, Ephesians 1:4; 2:7; 3:11, spanning from eternity past, if we can put it like this, into eternity future.  See also Ephesians 2:7.  The events of a few days, months, or even years, are just threads in the eternal tapestry God is weaving.

In thinking of the death of Christ, Peter boldly proclaimed, “It was not possible that He should be held by it, v. 24.  As proof, in vs. 25-28 he quotes Psalm 16:8-11, speaking in those verses of being in the Lord’s presence in heaven, v. 25, then that “his” soul would not be left in Hades, nor would “his” body see corruption, vs. 26, 27.

Just in passing, there are some who knock on your door who claim that “Hades” is merely the the physical grave.  This really isn’t the place to get into that, except to say this.  In Luke 12:4, 5, our Lord said, “And I say to you, My friends, do not be afraid of those who kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do.  But I will show you whom you should fear:  Fear Him who, after He has killed, has power to cast into hell; yes, I say to you, fear Him.”  It’s obvious from these verses that more than simple burying in the ground is in view.

Then, lest it should be thought that David was speaking merely of himself, Peter continues that he is both dead and buried, and his tomb is with us to this day, v. 29.  Obviously, his body had seen corruption.  In Psalm 16, Peter says, David wasn’t referring to his own body, but to the body of “the Christ,” the Messiah, who would indeed die and be buried, but not be there long enough for His body to begin to decay.  Hence, the importance of “three days and three nights” in our Lord’s death and burial.  Jewish tradition believed that the body didn’t begin to decay until the fourth day.  So Psalm 16 refers to our Lord, whose soul was not left in Hades, not did his flesh see corruption,  v, 31.

In addition, God had made some promises to David.  We read of these in 2 Samuel, where God said to David,

“When your days are fulfilled and you rest with your fathers, I will set up your seed after you, who will come from your body, and I will establish his kingdom.  He shall build a house for My name, and I will establish the throne of his kingdom forever….And your house and your kingdom shall be established forever before you.  Your throne shall be established forever,”  2 Samuel 7:12, 13, 17, emphasis added.

While it could be said that some of this refers to Solomon – who did indeed build a “house” for God’s name – David himself seems to have recognized something more was involved.  In v. 19, in praying to and thanking God for this overwhelming revelation, David said, “…and You have also spoken of Your servant’s house for a great while to come.”  

There’s some discussion about the phrase, “according to the flesh,” in Acts 2:30, but I don’t think it makes any difference.  According to Peter, David knew that the Messiah, a physical descendant of his – “the fruit of his body” – would one day sit on his throne.

Having been raise from the dead, Jesus ascended and, Peter says, “being exalted to the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, He poured out this which you now see and hear.” v. 33.

Thus, the apostles weren’t drunk; they had been recipients of the promise made to them by the Lord Jesus even before He was crucified, John 14: 16-18, “And I will pray the Father, and He will give you another Helper, that He may abide with you forever – the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees Him nor knows Him; but you know Him, for He dwells with you and will be in you.  I will not leave you orphans; I will come to you.”   This last He did in the person and power of the Holy Spirit.

But Peter isn’t quite finished.  As for the Lord Himself, He has been seated at the Father’s right hand, v. 34, “waiting expectantly” for the Father to put down His enemies, those, for example, who cried out for His crucifixion, whose spiritual descendants we see today all around us who demand the removal of any vestige of reference to Biblical truth.  Those who heard Peter were reminded that even though they had crucified the Lord Jesus, God had made Him “both Lord and Christ.”  One day, when He returns to this sin-ruined world, that will become obvious.

God is faithful to His promise.

Acts 1:1-11, Laying The Foundation

1] The former account I made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began to do and teach, 2] until the day in which He was taken up, after He through the Holy Spirit had given commandments to the apostles whom He had chosen, 3] to whom He also presented Himself alive after His suffering by many infallible proofs, being seen by them during forty days and speaking of the things pertaining to the kingdom of God.

4] And being assembled with them, He commanded them not to depart from Jerusalem, but wait for the Promise of the Father, “which,” He said, “you have heard from Me; 5] for John truly baptized with water, but you shall be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now.”  6] Therefore, when they had come together, they asked Him, saying, “Lord, will You at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?”  7] And He said to them, “It is not for you to know times or seasons which the Father has put into His own authority.  8] But you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be witnesses to Me in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.”

9] Now when He had spoken these things, while they watched, He was taken up, and a cloud received Him out of their sight.  10] And while they looked steadfastly toward heaven as he went up, behold, two men stood by them in white apparel, 11] who also said, “Men of Galilee, why do you stand gazing up into heaven?  This same Jesus, who was taken up from you into heaven, will so come in like manner as you saw Him go into heaven.” (NKJV)

Our Lord’s ministry after His resurrection is briefly described in the first 8 verses of Acts 1.  Forty days ministry is reduced to just a few words in v. 3.  Yet they serve to remind us that Acts didn’t happen in a vacuum, but is the continuation of what had begun in the lives of the apostles some three years earlier, and, indeed, in the life of mankind in the Garden of Eden.

Acts continues where the Gospel of Luke leaves off.  In that account, we have some post-resurrection appearances of our Lord, and then it closes with this:  And He led them out as far as Bethany.  Now it came to pass, while He blessed them, that He was parted from them and carried up into heaven.  And they worshiped Him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy, and were continually in the temple praising and blessing God.  Amen.  Luke 24:50.

Luke uses the ending of his account in the Gospel as the beginning of his letter to Theophilus.  The Gospel gives us an account of all that Jesus began both to do and to teach.  Some Bibles refer to Acts as “the Acts of the Apostles.”  This, I think, is incorrect.  Only three of the apostles, Peter, James and John, are mentioned, and of these three, we read mainly of Peter.  We don’t really count the mention of Judas, which happens only because he had to be replaced.  But even Peter gives place to Paul.  The other disciples, and Matthias, the replacement for Judas, disappear from the pages of Scripture.

As Luke tells us what the Lord Jesus began to do in His physical body, so Acts tells us what He continued to do through “His [spiritual] body, which is the church,” Colossians 1:24.

Our post today is divided into three parts, not a word-by-word study, but a summary, if you will, of essentials which weren’t only for the apostles but are for us as well.  These essentials serve to remind us that Christianity is not just another “world religion”.  In fact, it’s not of this world at all, or it has no value at all.  Its doctrines are unique.  Its Holy Book is authoritative in a way unlike any other book known to men.  Its character as revealed by its Author is such that there is no hope relative to eternity apart from it.

These three essentials remove as unimportant most of the traditions tacked on by men over the centuries.  These essentials are –

1. The Foundation of all we believe, vs. 1-3.

He…presented Himself alive…v. 1.

The Resurrection of Christ is God’s seal of approval, if you will, to the life and ministry of the Lord Jesus.  As we’ve said before, it marks as different the deaths of the men who died with Him that day, as well as every other death that’s ever happened.  If that is false, nothing else matters.  After dealing with some questions about the resurrection of our Lord and of the idea of resurrection in general, Paul wrote, If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men the most pitiable, 1 Corinthians 15:19.

The preaching of the early church was filled with the hope and truth of the Resurrection.  Preaching to the crowd who gathered because of the healing of a man born lame, Peter said that Christ has been killed, but “God raised [Him] from the dead, Acts 3:15.  The authorities, coming upon this scene, were greatly disturbed that they taught the people and preached in Jesus the resurrection from the dead, Acts 4:2.  Defending his message before these same authorities, Peter said, Let it be known to you all, and to all the peoples of Israel, that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God raised from the dead…,  Acts 4:10.

Extending the Gospel to Gentiles, after having been assured it was alright, in his remarks Peter told Cornelius and those gathered in his house that “Him [Jesus of Nazareth, v. 38] God raised from the dead, Acts 10:40, 41.

Paul held aloft that same torch.  In Acts 13:30, he told the Jews in Antioch in Pisidia, concerning Christ, that the Jews “took Him down from the tree and laid Him in a tomb.  But God raise Him from the dead.”  He repeats his thought in v. 34, “He raised Him from the dead, no more to return to corruption.”

There are multiple references to the Resurrection throughout the rest of Acts and the NT.  It isn’t just some fiction or fable designed to fool people.  The disciples were hard to convince he was alive!  Cf. John 20:24 with Thomas and Luke 24:9-11 with the eleven…and all the rest.  Peter and some of the others fully intended to go back to fishing as their livelihood, John 21:1-3.

What changed?

He…presented Himself alive….

2. The Fitness For All We Do, 1:4-5, 8.

These verses were given specifically to the apostles.  They are not for us today, though many speak of seeking “the baptism of the Holy Spirit.”  Pentecost cannot be duplicated anymore than the Crucifixion can be duplicated.  Nor is it necessary.

Having said that, even the apostles were “filled with the Spirit” more than once.  Cf. Ephesians 5:18.

Why did they need this?  In order to receive the power, the “ability” to do what the Lord told them to do. The word translated “power” is the word we get our words “dynamite,” “dynamo,” dynamic” from.  It refers to a power that gets the job done!  This is not something we have naturally!  We might have various natural gifts and abilities, but they’re not enough to “get the job done,” in spite of what we might think.  Even the OT recognized this.  Faced with an impossible task, Zerubbabel received this encouragement, “Not by might nor by power, but by My Spirit,” says the LORD of hosts, Zechariah 4:6.  Finney might have thought that “moral suasion” or human ability and wisdom was enough, but he was sadly mistaken.  We see the results of his teaching, and that of his followers with their emphasis on “making your decision” and “results” and “raising your hand for salvation” in the mess all around us, even in the churches.

All believers have something of the Spirit, it’s not something we have to “ask” for.  In those Gospel verses which are sometimes used to teach otherwise – the Spirit had not yet been given.  That is not true now.  The manifestation of the Spirit is given to each one for the profit of all [lit., “for the mutual benefit.” – the “gifts of the Spirit” aren’t about us, but about serving others], 1 Corinthians 12:7.  One and the same Spirit works all these things, distributing to each one individually as He wills, 1 Cor. 12:11.  Indeed, if anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ [that is, the Holy Spirit], he is not His, Romans 8:9.

3. The Focus of All We Hope, 1:6-7, 9-11.

In Acts 1:3, Luke tells us that for forty days, the Lord had taught of things pertaining to the kingdom of God.  During His ministry, it had occupied an important place.  Matthew 8:11; 19:27-29; 20:20-23; Mark 14:24, 25; Luke 22:15-18, 29-30 are just a few of the references to the kingdom of God, or of heaven given in the Gospels.  The disciples had heard most, if not all, of these and some of them speak directly to the involvement and importance of the disciples in that kingdom, cf. Matthew 19:28; Luke 22:30.  Just in passing, and without particularly meaning to be difficult, I can’t really see how these two verses are “fulfilled” in the church.

According to Luke, the Lord continued teaching after His resurrection.  As a result of this teaching, one of the disciples asked what seems to me to be a reasonable question:  “Lord, will you at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?” Acts 1:6.  If, as some believe, God is done with Israel and there is no kingdom for her, it seems to me that this would have been an ideal place for the Lord to have told that to His disciples.  But there’s no whisper of such a thought.  The disciples had asked, “Is it time“?  The Lord answered, “It is not for you to know times or seasons…,”  vs. 6, 7.  It’s no use trying to set dates, though that doesn’t stop folks from trying; all that is under the “authority” of the Father – and He isn’t telling us.

In the meantime, there was something for the disciples – and for us – to do, to be witnesses to [Him] in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth,” v. 8.

In His earthly ministry, the Lord Jesus promised the Holy Spirit to His disciples, saying, “…when He, the Spirit of truth, has come, He will guide you into all truth; for He will not speak on His own, but whatever He hears He will speak; and He will tell you things to come.  He will glorify Me, for He will take of what is Mine and declare it to you, John 16:13, 14.

Pay special attention to v. 14:  “He will glorify Me….”  Literally, it reads, “Me He will glorify….”  It’s emphatic – the ministry of the Spirit is to glorify the Lord Jesus.  Not Himself.  Not believers.  Not the “gifts.”

The Lord Jesus.

Any ministry which emphasizes the Spirit or His gifts or any believer doesn’t understand the ministry of the Spirit.  In everything, the Lord Jesus is to have first place, if not the only place, Colossians 1:18.  There are far too many in the modern church like Diotrephes, 3 John 1:9.

But it isn’t just who our Lord was or what He did or taught.  These are vitally important.  The angel made a promise to the disciples as they gazed heavenward toward that One they loved:  “Men of Galilee, why do you stand gazing into heaven?  This same Jesus, who was taken up from you into heaven, will so come in like manner as you saw Him go into heaven,” Acts 1:11.

Having finished His earthly mission, our Lord ascends, leaving His disciples with a blessing and a promise.  They never forgot.

Nearly 70 years later, the last surviving apostle, given a vision of His eternal exaltation and splendor, and hearing again from His blessed lips the promise of His coming, wrote in the last verse of the New Testament but one, the heart cry and soul’s desire of His people ever since.  Is it yours?  Is it mine?  It must be.  It must be!

EVEN SO, COME, LORD JESUS!

Revelation 22:6-21, “Even So, Come, Lord Jesus!”

6] Then he said to me, “These words are faithful and true,”  And the Lord God of the holy prophets sent His angel to show His servants the things which must shortly take place.

7] “Behold, I am coming quickly!  Blessed is he who keeps the words of the prophecy of this book.”

8] Now I, John, saw and heard these things.  And when I heard and saw, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel who showed me these things.

9] Then he said to me, “See that you do not do that.  For I am your fellow servant, and of your brethren the prophets, and of those who keep the words of this book.  Worship God.”  10] And he said to me, “Do not seal the words of this prophecy, for the time is at hand.  11] He who is unjust, let him be unjust still;  he who is filthy. let him be filthy still; he who is righteous, let him be righteous still; he who is holy, let him be holy still.”

12] “And behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me, to give every one according to his work.  13] I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End, the First and the Last.”

14] Blessed are those who do His commandments, that they may have the right to the tree of life, and may enter through the gates into the city.  But outside are dogs and sorcerers and sexually immoral and murderers and idolaters, and whoever loves and practices a lie.

16] “I, Jesus, have sent My angel to testify to you these things in the churches.  I am the Root and Offspring of David, the Bright and Morning Star.”

17] And the Spirit and the bride say, “Come!”  And let him who hears say, “Come!”  And let him who thirsts come.  Whoever desires, let take of the water of life freely.

18] For I testify to everyone who hears the words of the prophecy of this book:  If anyone adds to these things, God will add to him the plagues that are written in this book; 19] and if anyone takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part from the Book of Life, from the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book.

20] He who testifies to these things says, “Surely I am coming quickly.”

Amen.  Even so, come, Lord Jesus!

21] The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all.  Amen. (NKJV)

Verse 6 is a witness to the authenticity of Revelation.  It says a lot about the wickedness of human nature that, over and over, God has to assure us that He can be trusted and that His word is true.

The second clause refers to the Lord God of the holy prophets, reminding us of 2 Peter 1:21, for prophecy never came by the will of man, but holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Spirit.  That’s why His word is “faithful and true.”  It isn’t just the product of man’s wisdom or imagination.  “Holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Spirit.”

The Lord refers to His coming three times in this chapter, in vs. 7, 12 and 20.  In v. 7, it’s in connection with the prophecy of this book.  This doesn’t mean that prophecy is something to speculate or argue about or to sensationalize or trivialize.  It’s to assure us that the future is in His hands and that He has everything under control.  In v. 12, it’s in connection with His purpose to give everyone according to his work.  It’s too easy for us to seek a reward in the approval and praise of mere men, but the only praise that will amount to anything is the commendation of the One who is the Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the End, the First and the Last.  The interesting thing is that He says it’s His “Reward.”  Unbelievers and skeptics, those who scorned Him at His First Coming and hanged Him on a Cross, and those down through the ages who have rejected Him or corrupted His teachings will discover that He is the Judge, not them!

Both the godly and the ungodly will find this to be true.  The godly, those who do His commandments, v. 14, will enter the city.  The wicked, described in v. 15, will never enter that city.  There will be nothing that corrupts or defiles allowed into that eternal paradise.

V. 15 says these things are to be testified in the churches.  Yet how seldom is this true, that churches are given the message in this book.  I know there is a lot of discussion, sometimes heated, about what that message is, but if nothing else, it concerns what is the emphasis in these verses:  that the Lord Jesus will return to this earth, that there is coming a time of reward or punishment, and that the invitation is freely given to “Come.”  I don’t have access to the original language at this time (I’m actually on vacation), but I wouldn’t be surprised if this word isn’t an imperative, that is, a command, for folks to come to the Savior.  This is similar to Acts 17:30, which says, God commands all men everywhere to repent.

There’s some discussion as to whether the Gospel is an offer or an invitation.  I think it’s actually a proclamation from the Court in Heaven that men are under condemnation because of their sin, but God, the High King of Heaven, has made a way of escape through His Son and those who repent of their sins and trust in Him for salvation will receive a full and complete pardon for those sins.

Verse 11 troubles some people:  He who is unjust, let him be unjust still; he who is filthy, let him be filthy still; he who is righteous, let him be righteous still; he who is holy, let him be holy still.  Some might think that the verse means that God is ok with unjust and filthy lives.  Perish the thought.  We think our Lord’s teaching in Matthew 13 is the answer.  In this chapter, He is describing the Kingdom of God using various similes and pictures.  In vs. 24-30 he uses the analogy of a man sowing wheat in his field.  An enemy comes along and sows tares in that same field.  BTW, the NIV version saying “weeds” is terribly inadequate and misleading.  Our Lord isn’t talking about something like dandelions!  No, no, the idea is that tares are almost indistinguishable from true wheat until harvest, hence, the reference to harvest in v. 30.

The meaning is that we can’t infallibly tell the heart condition of anyone.  Some looked down on in “church” might actually be godly individuals, while some who have huge ministries but whose praise is from men might find that that is all the reward they will ever get, and the Lord will tell them to depart from Him, Matthew 25:41.  This does not mean that there can be no church discipline or that we can’t “judge” brethren whose lives don’t measure up to Scripture.  It does mean that we are neither infallible nor omniscient.

There is also a solemn warning against tampering with the contents of this Book.  There’s some discussion about whether this warning is only for Revelation or for the whole Bible.  I think it’s the latter.  This book is God’s Word, and it’s a terrible presumption and a great wickedness for anyone to believe that it can be improved upon.  There has been no revelation since John closed his writing and to say otherwise is a wicked sin.

We can have no better close for this  post and this series than the one John gave to his own writing:

Even so, come, Lord Jesus!

The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all.  Amen.

Revelation 22:1-5, Paradise Regained.

1] And he showed me a pure river of water of life, clear as crystal, proceeding from the throne of God and of the Lamb.  2] In the middle of its street,and on either side of the river, was the tree of life, which bore twelve fruits, each tree yielding its fruit every month.  The leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations.  3] And there was no more curse, but the throne of God and of the Lamb shall be in it, and His servants shall serve Him.  4] They shall see His face, and His name shall be on their foreheads.  5] There shall be no night there:  They need no lamp nor light of the sun, for the Lord God gives them light.  And they shall reign forever and ever.  (NKJV)

These verses continue and finish the description of “the new heaven and the new earth” begun in chapter 21.  So far we’ve seen something of the New Jerusalem and of the inhabitants of the new earth.  Now we see something of the blessings of that eternal life.

In Psalm 46:4, the Psalmist wrote, There is a river whose streams make glad the city of God.  We believe this is a prophetic reference to “the pure river of water of life” John described in v. 1.  By the way, this river flows “out of,” not “by,” the throne, as one religious song used to put it.

However, John describes some things the Psalmist didn’t mention.  V. 2 might be translated, “Between its avenue on this side and its river on that side was the tree [or, wood] of life bearing fruit twelve times, yielding its fruit every month; and the leaves of the tree [or, wood] were for the healing of the nations.”

John describes what we would call a lush, beautiful park.  The Greek word is, “paradise,” hence the title.  As in the beginning, God fellowshiped with our first parents in a park, so throughout eternity He will do so in the New Jerusalem.

The leaves of the tree are for the “healing” of the nations.  The Greek word is where we get our word, “therapy”.  I don’t understand what might be involved in that thought, but Adam and Eve ate before the Fall.  Our Lord ate in His resurrected body, though it wasn’t necessary to His well-being.  Though the saints will have glorified bodies, there will be others who, though perfect and sinless, will have ordinary physical bodies, which perhaps will need some care.  As I said, I don’t really know.

V. 3-5 gives us the reason why eternity will be perfect for God’s people:  “there shall be no more curse, but the throne of God and of the Lamb shall be in it, and His servants shall serve Him.”  Never again will the glories of Heaven be marred by the intrusion of rebellion.  “They shall see His face, and His name shall be on their foreheads.”  Only once or twice in Biblical history have men been allowed anywhere near to the God of heaven and that was only very briefly.  Here such association will be forever.

There are records of men having been caught up into heaven and telling their stories.  I make no judgment on these stories, but after being caught up into the third heaven, Paul wrote that he heard inexpressible words, which it is not lawful to utter, 2 Corinthians 12:4.  The ESV translates this, he heard things that cannot be told, which man may not utter.   There is only one source of “heavenly things” and it’s not the minds or experiences of mere men.  Besides, these things “cannot be told.”  How could we?  What do we have in this life or world to compare?

It will be a time of continual day, with no need of artificial light, v. 5.  Cf. 21:23.  We will have the “true light,” that One who said, “Let there be light…,” Genesis 1:3.  God is light and in Him is no darkness at all, 1 John 1:5.

We live in a time when Christians are increasingly disregarded, even despised.  In some countries, the tag is a death sentence.  Somewhere in this world, a brother or sister may be killed while you read these words.  We won’t read or hear about them because, in the world’s eyes, they’re not important, maybe even deserve to die.

The time is coming when that won’t be true:  “they shall reign forever and ever.”  The devil will not forever have his way in this world.

This verse closes our view of the future.  Vs. 6-21 deal with other things.  We only have a brief glimpse of things which must shortly take place, v. 6.  Again, we don’t believe the angel was telling John that these things would happen soon, as we’ve said elsewhere.

But…

They will happen.

Revelation 21:21-27: No Temple There.

21] The twelve gates were twelve pearls:  each individual gate was one pearl.  And the street of the city was pure gold, like transparent glass.

22] But I saw no temple in it, for the Lord God Almighty and the Lamb are its temple.  23] The city had no need of the sun or of the moon to shine in it, for the glory of God illuminated it.  The Lamb is its light.  24] And the nations of those who are saved shall walk in its light, and the kings of the earth bring their glory and honor into it.  25] Its gates shall not be shut at all by day (there shall be no night there).  26] And they shall bring the glory and the honor of the nations into it.  27] But there shall by no means enter it anything that defiles, or causes an abomination or a lie, but only those who are written in the Lamb’s Book of Life. (NKJV)

We went over much of this in our last post; there are just a few things we want to look at again in this post.

Verse 21 describes the gates, or “portals,” into the city,.  “Each and every gate” is a single pearl.  An average pearl is less than the size of a marble.

Walls of gold and precious stones; gates of pearl.  All this beauty and glory teach us the poverty of this old world.  We don’t use gold or gems in construction.  They are much too expensive!  We have to use much cheaper materials!  Gold is at the top of standards of wealth and luxury.  No one would look on cement or asphalt as being “treasures”.  Though they, too, may be expensive, they aren’t really “worth” anything.  No young man goes out and buys a ring of cement for his beloved!  Yet God’s list of “treasures” shows gold at the bottom of the list, as it were.  As man’s wisdom is counted foolish to God, so his wealth is counted worthless.

But the pearl may have something to say to us, as well.  It might serve as a something of a picture of salvation.  A pearl is the result of a grain of sand or some other object working its way into the shell of an oyster.  Not being able to get rid of it, the oyster begins to secrete a substance which coats the object, evidently making it less burdensome to the oyster, but a thing of value to us.

So it is spiritually.  We may be very “attractive” on the outside, but on the inside is only corruption and sin, as Paul discovered, according to Romans 7.  The “coating” we have is “the robe of righteousness” given to us by the Lord Jesus.  It is this which makes us “accepted in the Beloved,” even as a grain of sand is “accepted” in the pearl.  So, in Christ alone are we worth anything.  The day is coming, praise God, when there will no “sand,” only perfect righteousness, inside and out.

The word translated “street” refers to “a broad place,” such as a park or an “avenue.”  It might have reference to a “town square”.  Perhaps it is the place where God’s throne will be.

V. 22 indicates that there will not be any temple in the city.  On this earth, there have been several temples and there will yet be a temple, both during the Tribulation and during the Millennium.  They symbolize that man is a sinner and that there is a barrier between God and man which can be broken down only by a blood sacrifice.  There is no temple in the New Jerusalem because Jesus has died, sin has been dealt with and sinners have been made righteous through Him.  There will be no need for such a place so that men can be restored to fellowship with God because that fellowship will never, nor indeed can ever, be broken in eternity.  Everything the redeemed ever need will be found in God and in the Lamb.  There will be no need for an intermediary, whether person or place.

Perhaps there is a lesson for us in this.  I know the Lord instructed Israel about both the Tabernacle and the Temple, so there’s nothing wrong with a building, as such.  It’s just that it’s so easy for us to get all wrapped up in ornate or fancy surroundings and forget that it’s supposed to be about worship and service of the Lord.

Verses 24-26 gives us a taste of what life will be like in this new place.  It seems that “life” will be somewhat like we know today, with “nations” and such, but without sin and its effects.  Perhaps it will be similar to what it would have been like had Adam and Eve never sinned.   Even in an unfallen world, there were things for Adam to do, and surely as they had children and families, there would have been some sort of “organization” of family or tribe or something.  Granted, it would have been far different than anything we’ve ever known, but it wouldn’t just be disorganized and every man for himself.  God is a God of order.  And He will recognized and worshiped in that future world.  He will have no “competition” and there will be no barrier between Him and His creation.

Once again, though, John closes this portion with a warning:  But there shall by no means enter it anything that defiles, or causes an abomination or a life, but only those who are written in the Lamb’s Book of Life, v. 26.

This isn’t a popular message today, when it’s believed that everyone is on their way to “a better place,” that there are many roads to that place, in fact, they all lead there, and that hell is just a fabrication of Bible-thumping fundamentalists.

But our Lord warned, “Enter by the narrow gate; for wide is the gate and broad is the way that leads to destruction, and there are many who go in by it.  Because narrow is the gate and difficult is the way which leads to life, and there are few who find it,”  Matthew 7:13, 14.  Elsewhere, He said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.  No one comes to the Father except through Me,” John 14:6, emphases added.

In agreement with this, Peter told the leaders of the nation, “Nor is there salvation in any other, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved,” Acts 4:12.

“No other name….”

“A narrow gate….”

“Wide is the way that leads to destruction….”

Oh, that we might understand the significance of these phrases.  Apart from the Lord Jesus Christ, there is no hope for the future.  There is nothing good to look forward to, only that our sins will have caught up with us.

He came to redeem sinners.  That’s the only folks He’s interested in.  He said, “I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners, to repentance,” Matthew 9:13; Mark 2:17; Luke 5:32.  Those who think they’re good enough or that they can make it to heaven on their own, well, they’re on their own.

There’s only “one name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved,” Acts 4:12.

“Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved.”

Revelation 20:7-15: The End.

7] Now when the thousand years have expired, Satan will be released from his prison, 8] and will go out to deceive the nations which are in the four corners of the earth, Gog and Magog, to gather them together to battle, whose number is as the sand of the sea.  9] They went up on the breadth of the earth and surrounded the camp of the saints and the beloved city.  And fire came down from God out of heaven and devoured them.  10] The devil, who deceived them, was cast it into the lake of fire and brimstone where the beast and the false prophet are.  And they will be tormented day and night forever and ever.

11] Then I saw a great white throne and Him who sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away.  And there was found no place for them.  12] And I saw the dead, small and great, standing before God, and books were opened.  And another book was opened, which is the Book of Life.  And the dead were judged according to their works, bu the things which were written in the books.  13] The sea gave up the dead which were in it, and Death and Hades delivered up the dead who were in them.  And they were judged, each one according to his works.  14] Then Death and Hades were cast into the lake of fire.  This is the second death.  15] And anyone not found written in the Book of Life was cast into the lake of fire.

In our last post, we looked at the first two of the four things contained in Revelation 20.  They were, 1) the binding of Satan, and, 2) the 1000 year reign of our Lord.  In this post, we want to consider the other two things.

1. The freeing of Satan from his prison, vs. 7-10.

We might ask, why is Satan freed, v. 7?  Has he served his sentence?  “Paid his debt?”  Is he out on parole?

Why is he let go?  What purpose could possibly be served in letting this archenemy of God and man loose?

Verses 8-10 give us the answer.

Satan immediately sets about to gather together the nations of mankind and rally them against God and His people.  And he is successful.  He will demonstrate once and for all that unrenewed human nature is enmity against God; for it is not subject to the law of God, nor indeed can be, Romans 8:7.  For 1000 years, Satan has not been able to deceive or mislead a single person, but will be bound and imprisoned – in a “solitary confinement” no earthly prison can begin to approach.  An environment as ideal as possible has been established on the earth.  War has been abolished and peace reigns universally.  Government will be just and righteousness, with no trace of the corruption so often associated with it.  Slums will be cleared away; there will be no “underprivileged” class.  The problems of pollution will be done away with.  Human longevity will be greatly increased, and death and disease, though still present, will be greatly curtailed.  “Evil influences” will be publicly unavailable and righteousness will be the order of the day.  Weather and physical changes on the earth will be beneficial and fertility will be greatly increased.

But, does all this blessing and improvement lead men to turn to God?  Psalm 18:44, As soon as they hear of me they obey me; the foreigners submit to me, and 66:3, say to God, “How awesome are Your works!  Through the greatness of Your power Your enemies shall submit themselves to You,” indicate otherwise.  The margins of both verses translate “submit” as “feigned obedience”.  Though everything on the surface seems to be ok, it will be seen to be only a superficial conformity to the rule of the Lord Jesus.  Human nature may be restrained by force and justice, but it can be renewed only by grace.  Isaiah 26:10 says, Let favour be shown to the wicked, yet he will not learn righteousness; in the land of uprightness will he deal unjustly, and will not behold the majesty of the LORD (KJV).  In fact, it often has the opposite effect,  Exodus 8:15; Ecclesiastes 8:11.  1000 years of “favour” will be showed, but multitudes indeed will not “learn righteousness.”

But doesn’t the Millennium start will everybody being saved?  Where do all these rebels come from?  Remember those who survive the Great Tribulation and are accounted “righteous” at the judgment of the nations will enter the Millennium, Matthew 25:34.  Unlike the OT and church saints, who will be in glorified bodies, these will still be in their natural bodies.  They will have children.  The favorable conditions and long lives will probably result in a great increase in population.  But these children, born under such different conditions as we know, will still be born sinners, Romans 3:23, and will still need to be saved.  Those who aren’t saved will become the rebels.  Once and for all, God will show that it is their nature and not a poor environment or the lack of education which makes men sinners.  They, and we, are born to it.

Verse 9 shows the result of this rebellion:  utter destruction.

This is the final scene of the last act of this earth’s history.  Man still refuses to bow to the God who created Him.

V. 10 shows the final judgment on Satan:  he joins the Antichrist and the false prophet in the lake of fire.  Many have difficulty accepting what these verses plainly teach: that hell is a place of torment, not annihilation, and it is forever and ever.  Though it may be said that this verse refers only to the Devil, the Antichrist and the False Prophet, Scripture teaches no other fate for those who go there than what we read here.

2. The Great White Throne judgment, vs. 11-15.

This judgment isn’t the same as the judgment recorded in Matthew 25:31-46.  Matthew records the judgment of nations before the Millennium; Revelation records the judgment of individuals after the Millennium, indeed after all human history is over and time itself, at least as we know it, is no more.  These verses are looking into eternity.

This is not a trial in any sense of the word.  Many have the idea that our “good” and our “bad” will be weighed in the balance and whichever is more determines our eternal destiny.  This is not a “general judgment” to determine such destiny, but a sentencing of the unsaved according to their works.  And John 3:18 says that, apart from faith in the Lord Jesus, we are condemned already.

No one will escape this judgment.  Even those long lost in the uncharted depths of the ocean will be there.  I don’t understand the references to “Death and Hades” in vs. 13 and 14, but it doesn’t matter.  God knows what He is doing.  No one will escape judgment.

V. 15 has the only “ray of hope” in this dark scene.  There is a “Book of Life.”  Those whose names are found there, and they only, escape being sent to the Lake of Fire.

While there is life, there is hope.  But after life is over, so is hope.

Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved.