Hebrews 10:1-25, The Way to God, part 1

[1]For the law, having a shadow of the good things come and not the very image of the things, could never with those same sacrifices, which they offer continually year by year, make those who approach perfect.  [2]For then would they not have ceased to be offered?  For the worshipers, once purified, would have had no more consciousness of sins.  [3]But in those sacrifices there is a reminder of sins every year.  [4]For it is not possible that the blood of bulls and goats could take away sins.  [5]Therefore, when He came into the world, He said, “Sacrifice and offering You did not desire, but a body You have prepared for Me.  [6]In burnt offerings and sacrifices for sin You had no pleasure.  [7]Then I said, ‘Behold, I have come – in the volume of the book it is written of Me – to do Your will, O God’.”  [8]Previously saying, “Sacrifices and offering, burnt offerings, and offerings for sin You did not desire, nor had pleasure in them” (which are offered according to the law), [9]Then He said, “Behold, I come to do Your will, O God.”  He takes away the first that He may establish the second.  [10]By that will we have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.  [11]And every priest stands ministering daily and offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins.  [12]But this Man, after He had offered one sacrifice for sins forever, sat down at the right hand of God, [13]from that time waiting till His enemies are made His footstool.  [14]For by one offering he has perfected forever those who are being sanctified.
[15]But the Holy Spirit also witnesses to us; for after He had said before, [16]“This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, says the Lord:  I will put My laws in their hearts, and in their minds I will write them,” [17]then He adds, “Their sins and their lawless deeds I will remember no more.”  [18]Now where there is remission of these, there is no longer an offering for sin.
[19]Therefore, brethren, having boldness to enter the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, [20]by a new and living way which He consecrated for us, through the veil, that is, His flesh, [21]and having a High Priest over the house of God, [22]let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water.  [23]Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for He who promised is faithful.  [24]And let us consider one another in order to stir up love and good works, [25]not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as is the manner of some, but exhorting one another, and so much the more as you see the Day approaching.  (NKJV)

In our last post, we noted the absolute contrast between the Old and the New Testaments, which are much more that just the respective collections of books that we know by those names.  As we saw, the Old Testament, or Covenant, was a two-fold revelation from God:  1) what was required if one were to come to God on his own merit, and 2) what was required since no one has such merit.

In other words, the Old Testament showed in the Law the absolute and inviolable perfection required by the nature and character of God.  The sacrificial system showed that no one ever had, or has, such perfection.  It also demonstrated the twin principles of substitution and sacrifice, principles shown from every sacrifice from that given for Adam and Eve down to the last one animal slain before the death of Christ.  His was the final sacrifice, and the only one that ever effectively dealt with sin.  Perhaps too simply put, “substitution” means that an animal died in the sinner’s place, and “sacrifice” means that the sinner lived in the animal’s place.  So with Christ:  He died in our place, and we live through Him.  Paul put it like this, For He [God] made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him, 2 Corinthians 5:21.  You see, the issue isn’t simply about “life” and “death,” but about “sin” and “righteousness”.

Though we’ll only look at part of these verses in this post, there are two things in our text:

1.  Preparation of the way to God, vs. 1-18.
2.  Participation in the way to God, vs. 19-25.

1. Preparation for the Way to God, 10:1-18

Giving of the Law, 10:1-4.  As we noted in earlier lessons, the Law was not given in order to provide a way of salvation, but to show that salvation was needed.

1. The Law was “the shadow of good things to come,” v. 1.  The Tabernacle and the sacrifices foreshadowed two things.
a. the sacrifices foreshadowed forgiveness.
b. the Tabernacle foreshadowed fellowship with God.
The purpose of redemption isn’t just so that we can go to Heaven, but that we may enjoy it when we get there.  Think about it.  If a person has no time for church or Scripture or spiritual things, but spends his time submerged in the things of this world, he would have nothing in common with the inhabitants of Heaven.  If he lives only to fulfill the desires and goals of the flesh, what will he do when these things are no longer important, or even possible?  If he knows only to curse God, how will he praise Him?  It isn’t just “streets of gold,” or “mansions” that will occupy us in heaven, but God Himself and the Lord Jesus.

And that’s not just for the future, but for this life, as well.  Death won’t be some magic transformation that changes us from what we are here to what we will be there.  The work is begun in this life, else there is nothing good in the next life.  Apart from the Lord Jesus Christ, there is only a “lake of fire” awaiting the lost, Revelation 20:15.  Redemption is the resumption of what was begun – and lost – in the Garden of Eden.  The Fall of man no more messed up God’s original purpose for mankind than the rejection of Jesus by the Jews messed up God’s plan for the Kingdom.

2. The Law was powerless to “take away sins,” vs. 2-4.  Why then was it given?  To drive home the truth about sin.  “By the law is the knowledge of sin,” Romans 3:20.  “The wages of sin is death,” Romans 6:23.  “And anyone not found written in the Book of Life was cast into the lake of fire,” Revelation 20:15, which v. 14 refers to as “the second death.”  Sin isn’t just some momentary foible or weakness; it has enormous, and eternal, repercussions.  After all, it was a “minor” sin, as we judge such things, that plunged the race into the misery it suffers now.  “Hell” may only a swear-word to many folks, but they will find out when it is too late that Hell is an awful and eternal reality.

Generating ofa body,” vs. 5-8.
1. desirability, vs. 5, 6.  “Wherefore” – the sacrifices weren’t just for the sake of sacrifices – God had “no pleasure” in them – but to teach salvation by substitution and sacrifice, the two cardinal truths of the Gospel.  There is no other way that God saves sinners.
2. declaration, vs. 7, 8.  This is a quote from Psalm 40:6-8.  “I come” is the prophecy of the One Who would “do your will, O God.” – Who would keep the Law perfectly and satisfy its penalty completely.  This was typified but never accomplished by the sacrifices.

Giving of the Sacrifice, vs. 9, 10.

These verses clearly tell us that we are neither justified nor sanctified by the Law, but by the sacrifice of Christ, also v. 14.  Verse 9 tells us what Christ meant in Matthew 5:17-20 about “fulfilling” the Law.
1. He came to clear away the traditions of men and to present the Law as it really was.
2. He came to satisfy all its requirements so that it has no claim on Him as a human being, and, therefore, no claim on those for whom He came as Substitute.

The New Covenant removes the necessity of the First Covenant, v. 9.  It accomplishes what the First Covenant required – perfect obedience and righteousness, but could never provide.

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March Memories: Jesus, The Good Shepherd.

In John 10, the Lord Jesus had a lot to say about His sheep.  Shepherds and sheep were a common sight, and He used them to illustrate redemption.  Without going into great detail, and in no particular order, there are several things in this chapter which illustrate the care of the Lord for His sheep.

1.  The shepherd has responsibility for the sheep.

By the very nature of his job, the shepherd is responsible for the welfare of his flock.  It is what he does.  He isn’t there for himself, but for them.  Further, he is accountable for what he does.  We see the Lord’s responsibility in John 10:16 (NKJV), where He said, “…other sheep I have which are not of this fold; them also I must bring….”  Notice the phrase, “I must bring.”  He has responsibility for the sheep.

He also has accountability.  In John 17:2, the Lord told the Father, “Those whom You gave Me I have kept, and none of them is lost except the son of perdition, that the Scripture might be fulfilled.”  The Lord is accountable to the Father for those whom the Father has given Him.

2.  The shepherd has authority over the sheep.

Because He is the shepherd, He has the right and the authority to enter the sheepfold, vs. 1,2, and to lead them out to pasture.  The doorkeeper, or security guard, to use the modern term, knows Him and will let Him in.

Indeed, our Great Shepherd of the sheep, Hebrews 13:20, has been given authority over all flesh, John 17:2 (emphasis added).  Have you ever really thought about that?  Does it just mean, as some seem to think, that He is now “ruling” in heaven?  I don’t wish to be difficult, but it seems to me from His own words that such a thought has nothing to do with what He actually said.  John 17:2 says, “…as You [the Father] have given Him authority over all flesh, that He should give eternal life to as many as You have given Him  (emphasis added).  A lot of people don’t like to hear that.  I do understand.

Our religious culture has been so filled with the idea that God’s done all He can do, and now it’s up to us, that any idea that that may not really be true is hard for some to accept.  This is not to deny our responsibility to preach the Gospel or to believe it.  Preaching is the means God uses to call in the sheep, and faith is the evidence that one is a sheep.  And “preaching” doesn’t just mean from a pulpit.  It has to do with anything that focuses attention on the Lord Jesus.  That might just be how we do our job.  A tract, this blog, a word of encouragement, all these may be included in “preaching.”

The shepherd has authority.

3.  The shepherd knows the identity of the sheep.

Perhaps there would be several flocks of sheep in a fold, but the shepherd knew which ones were his, vs. 4, 5.  And the sheep knew him,  Furthermore, he knew them individually.  He had named each of them, and called them one by one.  Naming animals is nothing new.

We’ve mentioned elsewhere the lovely duet sung in church to the effect that “when He died, He didn’t even know my name”!  That is a truly sad view of the death of Christ.  He knew His sheep when He hung on the Cross, dying for them.  He knew them before Genesis 1:1.  Their names were written in His Book of Life before time began, Revelation 13:8; 17:8.  And He will know them forever.

He knew everything about us,…and He died for us, anyway.  We are His.

4.  The shepherd guides the activity of the sheep.

He calls his own sheep by name and leads them out.  And when he brings them out, he goes before them, vs. 3, 4.  The Psalmist put it like this:  He makes me to lie down in green pastures; He leads me beside the still water, Psalm 23:2, 3.

5.  The shepherd seeks the prosperity of the sheep.

Now this doesn’t mean a fat bank account, a nice house and a Lexus out in the driveway, perfect health and wonderful relationships, as many in the church think, who seem to have no interest in anything beside this world.   The shepherd wanted his flock to be fed and watered and protected.  Our Lord has that for His own, but He has so much more besides.  He said, “I have come that they might have life, and they might have it more abundantly,”  v. 10.  Once again, the “abundant life” doesn’t refer to material things, though the Lord may give those to us.  Nor, as some believe, does it refer to a state of sinless perfection.  After all, the life the sheep have is eternal.  In the Lord Jesus Christ, the poorest believer has for free what all the wealth in the world for all time could not buy:  eternal life.  “Abundant life” isn’t the privilege for an elite few among believers.  It belongs to all of us because our Shepherd has given it to us.

6.  The shepherd provides security for the sheep.

In vs. 11-14, Jesus said, “The good shepherd gives his life for the sheep.  But he who is an hireling and not the shepherd, one who does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and flees; and the wolf catches them and scatters them.  I am the good Shepherd, and I know My sheep, and am known by My own.”  

Further, He said in vs. 27-30, “My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me.  And I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; neither shall anyone snatch them out of My hand.  My Father, who has given them to Me, is greater than all, and no one is able to snatch them out of My Father’s hand.  My Father and I are one.”

In those four verses is clearly stated the hated (at least by some), the hated doctrine of eternal security, centuries before John Calvin and the generation after him, which actually formulated the so-called “5 Points”.  Our Lord said that His sheep would never perish, and no one could take them away from Him or the Father.  To the idiotic idea that, well, yes, but they can leave, – that would just show that they weren’t sheep to begin with.  Cf. 1 John 2:19.

In v. 27, the tenses are all “present;” the sheep are hearing, the Lord is knowing, and the sheep are following.  Salvation isn’t something that just happened years ago with some “decision” or church rite.  It’s a “today” thing – which doesn’t mean that we can lose it tomorrow.  When tomorrow gets here, then it will be “today,” and the sheep will still be following….

Jesus and the Father are “one” in Their determination to save the sheep.  It’s a commentary on the sorry condition of Christianity that the belief that that can be thwarted is so widely held.  The sheep are Christ’s.  He cannot and will not lose them.

7.  The shepherd tends to the productivity of the sheep.

Leaving aside the fact that sheep can be food, they produce two things: wool and more sheep.  In John 15:5, 8, the Lord said, “I am the vine, you are the branches.  He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing…By this My Father is glorified, that you bear much fruit; so you shall be My disciples.”  The goal, and responsibility, of the Christian life is fruitfulness.  After listing several things to be developed as corollaries of faith, like virtue, knowledge, self-control, perseverance, godliness, brotherly kindness and love, Peter goes on to say, For if these things are yours and abound, you shall be neither barren nor unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ, 2 Peter 1:5-8.  This could really be a post in itself.

The LORD is my Shepherd….  These thought are just a small portion of what Psalm 23:1  means.
_______________

(Originally posted on April 12, 2013) edited and new material.

 

 

 

Reflections on the Death of a Sister.

A sister in Christ, that is.  I was an only child.

Her memorial service was this morning.  “Viewing” was Sunday.

The morticians did an admirable job preparing her.  Meaning no disrespect at all, I thought it was a little like fixing up a vacant house.  She doesn’t live there anymore.

But we came together to remember and honor her, not the mortal remains she left behind.

I was thankful the service wasn’t just some rote thing out of some “minister’s manual.”  It was from the heart, both the minister officiating and those who spoke of her.  There were a few tears, but there was a lot of laughter.  That’s the kind of person she was, a joy to be around, and a shining light for the glory of God in this dark world.

She was a shining example of what Paul meant when he wrote, For to me to live is Christ…, 

Jo suffered from Lupus for more than forty years, and came down with ALS just a few months before she died.  Though she was paralyzed and unable to speak at the end, yet someone’s comment during the service said to me that she had more joy in life than most of us who enjoy good health.  My wife and I visited her before she lost the ability to talk, and her cheerful demeanor and spirit blessed us more than we blessed her.  I’m sure of it.

A comment someone made while we were leaving the service struck me.  Like other comments I’ve heard over the years, it showed me how much we’ve been influenced by the thinking of the world.  This person said, “It’s good to be alive.”  My response, “Jo’s more alive now than we are.”

Another comment often heard, especially when someone is very sick:  “Well, that’s better than the alternative.”  No, it’s not, not for the Christian.  The rest of the verse from Paul quoted above is, …and to die is gain, Philippians 1:21.  There’s an interesting nuance in the original language missed in our English translations.  What Paul actually said was, “to have died is gain.”  His is the viewpoint of looking back at death and what’s on the other side of that door, not just at the door itself.

In spite of what the world wants to think, to die is not better than to live if the one dying doesn’t know the Lord Jesus as Savior.  There is no “better place” out there apart from Him.

But Jo was more than ready to go through the door, not because of her own efforts or goodness, as she herself would point out, but by the grace and mercy of God.

So, Jo, as we come to the end of the events of the day, we don’t say “goodbye.”  We just say, “Auf Wiedersehn, dear one.”  ‘Til we meet again.

Miss you.

On Approaching 75

Next year, Lord willing, I’ll be 75.

I’ve always known it was coming if the Lord let me live that long. It’s just that it struck me the other day that next year, I’ll be 75.

This is the latest in a series of what I suppose you might call epiphanies about growing up or growing old.

I have a vivid memory of my mother telling me I was getting too big for her to hold.  I don’t remember how old I was or what my reaction might have been, just that it happened.

When I was 8, for some reason I was thinking about being 21.  I have no idea why.  I was probably too young to be excited that I would be legally old enough to get drunk.  That idea has never appealed to me. It’s something I’ve never experienced. Can’t say I’ve missed it.  I’ve never understood how the morning after justified the night before.  Anyway, that was 13 years away – forever!

Several years later, I was thinking about when I was eight, and I literally and actually had to sit down at the realization that in 13 years, I would be 60!  I was 47 at the time.  That 13 years didn’t seem nearly as long as the first 13 years had seemed!

Now, next year, I’ll be 75.

Granted, that’s actually two birthdays from now, but still, it’s just next year I’ll be 75.  No big deal.  I suppose it is a landmark of sorts.  Still, it’s not nearly as “traumatic” as the idea of turning 60 had been.

A lot of time, a lot of memories.

55 years since high school.

48 years since Bible college.

43 years since I said, “I do.”

5 kids, 9 grandkids.

A lot of time, a lot of memories.

Still, in a way, it’s seems like no time at all.

James asked the question, For what is your life?  It is even a vapor that appears for a little time and then vanishes away, James 4:14.  For all the years I’ve lived, in the light of eternity, they’re nothing at all.

Eternity.

Eternal life.

A magazine I get recently had the article, “So You Want to Live Forever”.

I suppose a lot of people do.  They go to great trouble and expense to have their bodies frozen and preserved in the hope that down the road someone will figure out a cure for whatever ails them, and they can be revived and cured and live happily ever after.

I don’t think I’d like to live forever in this old body.  Too many kinks and creaks…. Glasses,  hearing aids, more face to wash….  I’m not complaining,  it’s just the way it is.

Even if they could “cure” all that, there’s still what’s on the inside – not organically, but spiritually.  No pill can cure that.  I wouldn’t want to live forever with the struggle between what I’d like to be and what I am.

Though I don’t put myself on his level, Paul struggled with this.  Romans 7 bears eloquent testimony to the war that raged in his soul.  I know there are some who believe that once you’re saved, you become sinless.  For them, Romans 7 describes Paul’s pre-conversion life.  But no unsaved person can say, …I delight in the law of God according to the inward man, Romans 7:22, or, So then, with the mind I myself serve the law of God. but with the flesh the law of sin, v. 25b

But there is still triumph in this melancholy chapter:  I thank God  – through Jesus  Christ our Lord, v. 25a.

And he had thoughts about this elsewhere.  In 2 Corinthians 4:16, Even though our outward man is perishing, yet the inward man is being renewed day by day.  For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, while we do not look at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen.  Then in 5:2, 7, he wrote, For in this [body] we groan, earnestly desiring to be clothed with our habitation which is from heaven….  For we walk by faith….

“Faith.”

Faith isn’t just about the “now,” that is, what we can get out of God.  He might be pleased to make us healthy or wealthy, but that’s not the primary purpose of faith.  Just in passing, on this “wealth” thing – in America, even a poor person is “wealthy” in comparison to most of the rest of the world.  There are a lot of statistics on this, but I remember reading a post from a college student who makes about $5,000 a year.  She said this put her in the top 20% as far as the world is concerned.

$5,000.

And now there is agitation in this country [the US] for a minimum income of $30,000+ a year  [figuring the minimum wage at full-time].  *sigh*

Faith isn’t so much about the the present, though it is that, as well.  It’s about the future and when we stand before God to give an account of the years He’s given us on this earth.

And Paul wasn’t alone in this.  Peter wrote in 1 Peter 1:3, Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who according to His abundant mercy has begotten us again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead,… 

“The resurrection of Jesus Christ.”

This is the basis, the only basis, for that “living hope” Peter referred to.  That and the death which preceded it.

You see, that spiritual struggle I wrote about earlier?  Only the Lord Jesus Christ can do anything about it.  We might be able to turn over some sort of a new leaf, but we’ll mess that one up, too.

It is faith in His death, in His payment for sin, in who He was and what He did that gives poor sinners like me any hope at all for when these 75 years, or whatever God gives me, are over.  He took a place on the Cross that I might be able to take a place in Heaven.

How I long for that day when, in the words of the old hymn, “Nothing between my soul and the Savior.”

“Nothing between” and I will be able to worship and serve Him as He deserves.

Will you join me?  Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved,.., Acts 16:31.

Hebrews 6:4-6: Putting Christ To An Open Shame

[This is the third of 3 projected posts]

In the first post, we saw that, in the phrase if they fall away, the writer wasn’t teaching that Christians could lose their salvation.

In the second post, we saw that the context of Hebrews 6:4-6 deals with the idea that the Christian life is just that: life, and, as such, has the expectation of growth and development into maturity.

There is much more that could be said about these verses.  For instance, even though Christians truly saved cannot lose their salvation, there are many, not truly saved, who do leave “the faith.”  This is evidence they were never saved to begin with, cf. 1 John 2:19.  The writer does have a little to say about them in Hebrews 6:7, 8.

That, however, isn’t the subject for this post.  It’s found in the last part of v. 6.

Thinking about it, I’m not sure that I even know how to write about this idea that the death of Christ on the Cross could somehow be turned into something that shames Him.

But that’s what the writer says – and why it is impossible to be saved a “second” time, …or a third, …or a fourth, because

they crucify again for themselves the Son of God, and put Him to an open shame.” 

“Put Him to shame,” because one for whom He died, and whom, it is said, He saved through faith, is, nevertheless, lost.  In other words, He failed.

How could this even be considered as a possibility?

It seems to me that even the idea that one could lose his or her salvation, let alone any such thing actually happening – even the very idea that anyone could lose their salvation is highly dishonoring to our Lord and puts Him to an open shame.

Hebrews 6:4-6: A Different View

[Post 2 of three projected posts]

In our first post, we looked at the idea that these verses teach that one can lose his or her salvation.  This view is based on the words, “if they fall away,” which is taken to mean that one who is truly saved, can “fall away” and ultimately be lost.  I had a Boston Church of Christ elder tell me that he believed that one could be a child of God and be in hell at the same time.

We examined that view.  However, those verses clearly state that if one could lose salvation, he or she could not be saved again.  Such a thing is impossible.

Well, then, if the writer wasn’t teaching the loss of salvation truly had, what was he teaching?

In the study of any Scripture, there are three things to keep in mind:
1.  context.
2.  context.
3.  context.

Kind of like the old saying that the three important things in real estate are location, location, location.

However, this is much more serious than that somewhat light-hearted, though often true, statement.

There really are three things to consider in “context.”

1.  What does the verse actually say?
This probably has more to do with “content,” but still is in the context of what the verse actually says.  We saw that in the first post.

2.  What does the surrounding context say?
That is, what do the verses around a particular verse say.  What does the paragraph or chapter say?  On this, remember that verse, paragraph and chapter divisions are not “inspired” by the Holy Spirit.  While perhaps making the study of Scripture “easier,” they often obscure the meaning because they break up the writer’s thought in ways that it shouldn’t be broken up.

3.  What does the Bible itself say?
That is, what is the teaching of the entire Bible on a given subject?  One or two verses on any subject cannot and do not give us a complete understanding of that subject.  John 3:16 isn’t all the Bible says about the love of God.  Ephesians 1:4 isn’t all the Bible says about election.  Acts 2:38 isn’t all the Bible says about baptism.  Acts 2:4 isn’t all the Bible says about the ministry of the Holy Spirit and tongues.  Matthew 7:1 isn’t all the Bible says about “judging”.  Etc., etc.

So.

What is the “context” of Hebrews 6:4-6?

Though it’s recipients aren’t named, it’s apparent that the book was written to Jewish Christians, who would have understood all the Old Testament references in the book.  These Hebrew believers were apparently suffering persecution because of their faith.  The Temple was still standing in Jerusalem and the sacrificial system was still being followed.  These believers were being tempted to desert Christ and go back to their old religion, to the old way of doing things.

The Book of Hebrews warns them not to do that.

Further, in 5:11 (NKJV), the writer sort of scolds them for not having matured to the point where he could teach them some things hard to explain.  He told them that they really needed to be taught the first principles of the oracles of God, v. 12, though they had been saved long enough that, he wrote, by this time you ought to be teachers, v. 12.

“First principles” are those things which a person just saved or just coming to salvation begins to understand.

However, the writer doesn’t take them back to those things.  In 6:1, he begins …leaving the discussion of the elementary principles of Christ, let us go on to perfection [maturity], NOT LAYING AGAIN THE FOUNDATION OF REPENTANCE FROM DEAD WORKS AND OF FAITH TOWARD GOD [emphasis added].

In other words, he doesn’t take them back to the point of their first being saved.  He wants them to “go on,” not “start over.”

Then

in v. 3, he makes a startling statement: and this we will do if God permits.

A lot of people seem to treat salvation kind of like a hat.  You put it on and if the wind blows it off, you just retrieve it and put it back on.  So, they “get saved” and if they “lose” it, they’ll just “get saved again.”  However, the salvation of our souls is a lot more serious than that.  Our “advancement” in the things of God, even our very entrance into them, is in the hands of God.  It’s not something to be thought of lightly or taken for granted.

You see, salvation is indeed “of grace,” so that no one need despair.  However, It is of “sovereign grace,” so that no one dare presume.

Then,

v.4, For it is impossible….

The reason the writer didn’t “take them back” is because that’s impossible.  There is no “redo” in salvation.  There is only “forward”.

Our Lord spoke of the new birth.  Both testaments say that the just shall live by faith, Habakkuk 2:4; Romans 1:17.  But life is more than just about “birth,” though that’s obviously essential.  My wife and I are looking forward, next Tuesday, Lord willing, to flying to Montana to meet our new granddaughter, who has just been born.  We’ll also see her big brother, whom we have met.  But he won’t be just a new baby.  He’s about three years old.  He’s grown.

Our other grandchildren were once just babies.  But now two of the boys are teenagers and the others aren’t far behind.  I kid my daughter that in 10 years or so, she can look forward to being a grandmother. 🙂  I hope mom and I are still around to see that.

They’ve all grown.

Birth.

Life.

Growth.

The writer to the Hebrews tells his readers that they’re not still to be “newborns,” they’re supposed to grow, develop, mature.

In the context of Hebrews, “falling away” isn’t about denying the Lord, or of walking away from the things of God.  It’s about “standing still,” not progressing, not growing, not “living.”  We might paraphrase it as “falling by the wayside.”

The writer told his readers,

“It’s time to grow up.”