The Table of Showbread

“You shall also make a table of acacia wood; two cubits shall be its length, a cubit its width, and a cubit and a half its height.  And you shall overlay it with pure gold, and make a molding of gold all around.  You shall make for it a frame of a handbreadth all around, and you shall make a gold molding for the frame all around.  And you shall make for it four rings of gold, and put the rings on the four corners that are at its four legs.  The rings shall be close to the frame, as holders for the poles to bear the table.  And you shall make the poles of acacia wood, and overlay them with gold, that the table may be carried with them.  You shall make its dishes, its pans, its pitchers, and its bowls for pouring.  You shall make them of pure gold.  And you shall set the showbread on the table before Me always,” Exodus 25:23-30 NKJV.

And Moses spoke to all the congregation of the children of Israel saying, “…gifted artisans among you shall come and make…the showbread,” Exodus 25:4,10,13, and all the other parts of the tabernacle.  There is no recipe given to us, though, for that bread.

He made the table of acacia wood; two cubits was its length, a cubit its width, and a cubit and a half its height.  And he overlaid it with pure gold, and made a molding all around it.  Also he made a frame of a handbreadth all around it, and made a molding of gold for the frame all around it.  And he cast for it four rings of gold, and put the rings on the four corners that were at its four legs.  The rings were close to the frame, as holders for the poles to bear the table.  And he made the poles of acacia wood to bear the table, and overlaid them with gold.  He made of pure gold the utensils which were on the table:  its dishes, its cups, its bowls, and its pitchers for pouring, Exodus 37:10-16 NKJV.

These are only a few of the 20 references in Scripture to the showbread.

This bread and the various offerings and sacrifices brought by the Israelites made up a large part of the food for the priests, cf. Matthew 12:4.

In John 6, that most misunderstood and controverted chapter, our Lord four times refers to Himself as “bread”:

John 6:33, “For the bread of God is He who comes down from heaven and gives life to the world.”

John 6:35, And Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life.  He who comes to Me shall never hunger and he who believes in Me shall never thirst.”

John 6:48, “I am the bread of life.”

John 6:51, “I am the living bread which came down from heaven.  If anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever; and the bread which I give is My flesh, which I shall give for the life of the world.”

There has been a lot of discussion, to put it mildly, over the centuries about what our Lord meant by these statements.  It’s not our purpose to enter into that discussion in this post.

At the same time, what did our Lord mean?

I believe He Himself tells us in the Gospels.

Matthew and Mark give us an account of the Passover our Lord observed just before His crucifixion.

In Matthew 26, we read, And as they were eating , Jesus took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to the disciples and said, “Take, eat; this is My body.”
Then He took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, “Drink from it, all of you.  For this is My blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.  But I say to you, I will not drink of this fruit of the vine from now on until that day when I drink it new with you in My Father’s kingdom,” 
vs. 26-29.

Mark 14 gives us this account:
And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “Take, eat; this is My body.”
Then He took the cup and when He had given thanks He gave it to them, and they all drank from it.  And He said to them, “This is My blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many.  Assuredly, I say to you, I will no longer drink of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new in the kingdom of God,”
vs. 22-25.

It seems clear to me that our Lord is not saying, “This bread becomes My body,” as some religious organizations teach.  He is saying, “This bread represents My body.”

Paul had some further teaching on this.  Writing to a church which had completely missed the mark on this ordinance, he wrote,
For as often as you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death till He comes.  Therefore whoever eats this bread or drinks this cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord, 1 Corinthians 11:26, 27.

When our Lord said that those who partake of this bread will live forever, John 6:51, was He saying that the mere eating of the bread and drinking of the cup in a church setting confers eternal life??

No, He wasn’t.

We have to remember what these elements represent, namely, the sacrificial death of the Lord Jesus on the Cross, as Paul wrote.  It is His death which saves us.  Communion is merely a symbol, a picture, of that death.

In my wallet, I carry pictures of our family.  One of the women in those pictures is my wife.  But those pictures have never told me that they love me, have never held me, have never fixed a meal for me, never bore our children.

They’re just pictures.

Likewise, communion is just a picture, with no more power to save than those pictures of my wife have power to do anything for me.

I’ve been around church most of my adult life.  One thing I’ve noticed is that we like to eat:  fellowship dinners, going out after church on Sunday, and what not.  A lot of us could probably do less in that department.  The thing is, are we spiritually as well-fed?

How much time do we spend feeding our souls?  What would they look like if we could see them?  Well-fed or emaciated?

How much time do we spend in the Word?  I’m not talking about a quick read in some devotional booklet.  These might be useful, but I compare them to fast food, as opposed to a good, hearty dinner.  How much time do we spend in God’s Word itself – Genesis through Revelation?

Though I’ve tried several different ways of reading it, I suggest going through the whole Bible once and then going back through the New Testament again.  And then do it again.  And again.  And again.  Even after half-a-century of reading, I find things I never noticed before.  If the Lord were to give me another half-century, I would still find new things.

Oh, that we might follow the advice of the Psalmist in Psalm 34:8 and taste and see that the LORD is good.

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The Lampstand

“You shall also make a lampstand of pure gold; the lampstand shall be of hammered work.  Its shaft, its branches, its bowls, its ornamental knobs, and flowers shall be of one piece.  And six branches shall come out of its sides:  three branches of the lampstand out of one side, and three branches of the lampstand out of the other side.   Three bowls shall be made like almond blossoms on one branch, with an ornamental knob and a flower, and three bowls made like almond blossoms on the other branch, with an ornamental knob and a flower – and so for the six branches that come out of the lampstand.  On the lampstand itself four bowls shall be made like almond blossoms, each with its ornamental knob and flower.  And there shall be a knob under the first two branches of the same, a knob under the second two branches of the same, and a knob under the third two branches of the same. according to the six branches that extend from the lampstand.  Their knobs and their branches shall be of one piece; all of it shall be one hammered piece of pure gold.  You shall make seven lamps for it, and they shall arrange its lamps so that they give light in front of it.  And its wick-trimmers and their trays shall be of pure gold.  It shall be made of a talent of pure gold, with all these utensils.  And see to it that you make them according to the pattern which was shown you on the mountain, Exodus 25:31-40 NKJV.

He also made the lampstand of pure gold; of hammered work he made the lampstand.  Its shaft, its branches, its bowls, its ornamental knobs, and its flowers were of the same piece.  And six branches came out of its sides:  three branches of the lampstand out of one side, and three branches of the lampstand out of the other side.  There were three bowls made like almond blossoms on one branch, with an ornamental knob and a flower, and three bowls made like almost blossoms on the other branch, with an ornamental knob and a flower – and so for the six branches coming out of the lampstand.  And on the lampstand itself were four bowls made like almond blossoms, each with its ornamental knob and flower.  There was a knob under the first two branches of the same, a knob under the second two branches of the same, and a knob under the third two branches of the same, according to the six branches extending from it.  Their knobs and their branches were of one piece; all of it was one hammered piece of pure gold.  And he mad its seven lamps, its wick-trimmers, and its trays of pure gold.  Of a talent of pure gold he made it, with all its utensils. Exodus 37:17-24 NKJV.

And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak to Aaron, and say to him, ‘When you arrange the lamps, the seven lamps shall give light in front of the lampstand’.”  And Aaron did so; he arranged the lamps to face toward the front of the lampstand, as the LORD commanded Moses.  Now this workmanship of the lampstand was hammered gold; from its shafts to its flowers it was hammered work.  According to the pattern which the LORD had shown Moses, so he made the lampstand, Numbers 8:1-4 NKJV.

This article of furniture must have been beautiful beyond description – and yet hidden away in a room only a few men were ever permitted to enter.  It was the source of light for that room.

Scripture has a lot to say about light, from its creation as a separate thing from the One who created it, who is light, 1 John 1:5; Genesis 1:3, to its being unnecessary in the New Jerusalem, where the glory of God illuminated it.  The Lamb is its light.  And the nations of those who are saved shall walk in its light, Revelation 21:23-24a.  There shall be no night there:  They need no lamp nor light of the sun, for the Lord God gives them light, Revelation 22:5a.

“The Lord God gives them light.”

The Psalmist understood this:

For with you is the fountain of life; In Your light we see light, Psalm 36:9.

This is true in the natural realm, certainly, and very few would deny light’s existence, though many deny its creation by God, but it is also true in the spiritual realm, a realm which many deny, seeking to explain everything by natural processes.

The natural man does not receive the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; not can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned, 1 Corinthians 2:14.

But there is an agent beyond man’s natural frailty who contributes to this inability:

whose minds the god of this age has blinded, who do not believe, lest the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, should shine on them, 2 Corinthians 4:4.

Notice Paul’s emphasis:  “the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God….”

Of all the truths of Scripture, the deity of the Lord Jesus is one of the most disputed.  Sinful men will perhaps allow Him to be a teacher, thought they ignore what He taught, or they might allow Him to be a good man who was caught up in the intrigue of His time. but the idea that He was and is the second person of the Trinity is just a bridge too far, as is His statement that He is the only Savior and the only way into the presence of God,

“I am the way, the truth, and the life.  No one comes to the Father except through Me,” John 14:6.

What do you think of the Son of Man?

Your eternal destiny depends on that answer.

In Transit

Sorry to have been so long since the last post, but we’ve moved several hundred miles from where we were since then.  The last post gave some idea of what we were doing in preparation for the move.

This post is a little bit about the other end of that move.  We have arrived and are in the process of getting everything moved in – sort of.  I’m sitting here looking out a picture window at a beautiful panorama of snow-covered mountains, though there’s no snow here, thankfully.  It’s 102 degrees outside, but the humidity is only 20%.  I don’t remember it getting that hot in the 18 years we lived in Indiana, but neither do I remember humidity anywhere that low!  I think I’ve mentioned that one of the TV weathermen back there considered 55% humidity to be “refreshing.”

I’ve lived in this state, on and off, for about 40 years.  I’m home.

And yet…

I’m not.

Scripture teaches that this world is not our final abode.  It teaches that there is life, or at least existence, after death.  That there are places called “heaven” or “hell.”  That only through the Lord Jesus Christ may we enter the one and avoid the other.  My body and my mind are still adjusting to all the changes, but one thing that will never change is the certainty that this life isn’t all that there is.

In a very real sense, I’m still “in transit”.

So are you.

“Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved,” Acts 16:31.

 

“This Little Light…”

“You shall also make a lampstand of pure gold; the lampstand shall be of hammered work….  You shall make seven lamps for it, and they shall arrange its lamps so that they give light in front of it.  And its wick-trimmers and its trays shall be of pure gold.  It shall be made of a talent of pure gold, with all these utensils.  And see to it that you make them according to the pattern which was shown you on the mountain, Exodus 25:31, 37-40 NKJV.

He also made the lampstand of pure gold; of hammered work he made the lampstand….    And he made its seven lamps, its wick-trimmers, and its trays of pure gold.  Of a talent of pure gold he made it, with all its utensils, Exodus 37:17, 23-24 NKJV.

This is the second piece of furniture in the holy place – the first compartment of the tabernacle.  It’s perhaps the most important piece, if “rank” can be assigned to these pieces, because by it the priest could see the other pieces and could see where he was and where he was going.

Scripture has a great deal to say about “light.”

One thing it says is in John 1:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  He was in the beginning with God.  All things were made through Him, and without Him nothing was made that was made.  In Him was life, and the life was the light of men.  And the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it, vs. 1-4.

These verses tell us that God is the source of light, or, more specifically, “the Word,” the Lord Jesus, is that source.  In Genesis 1:3, God said, “Let there be light,” and created light as something distinct from Himself, who, Himself, is Light, 1 John 1:5.

John 1 further says that life itself is “light:”  the life was the light of men.  Life itself tells us that there is “more to life” than life.  This is spite of the fact that evolution tells us that man is just a sad, essentially useless cosmic accident, with no purpose or meaning.  This world and all that’s in it will wend its way through the ages that remain until the Sun, with its last dying gasp, flames out and extinguishes everything.

But man knows innately that there is something more “out there.”  How many religions and philosophies there are which want “to ascend,” want to leave this physical plane for some “spiritual” something or other that is said to be superior to, and “beyond,” ordinary life.

_______________

1. Light guides us.

I’m thinking here of the old sailing days, before GPS and all the electronic gadgets that we have.  Old time sailors were not without their own navigational aids in the stars and Sun and lighthouses and a lot of knowledge that I’m afraid is pretty much lost to us.  We can’t hardly go to the corner store without consulting Alexa or some other electronic device.  Even then, our eyes are glued to our phones, to the extent that, according to the latest news,  “distracted driving” has become a major problem and is an increasing cause of traffic accidents and deaths.

To the old-timers, a lighthouse was a welcome sight.

Scripture also guides us and gives us some indication as well as to what is “out there.”  It tells us that there is indeed more to life than life and that when this life is over, life itself is not over.

There’s a story told of a little country church that was surrounded by fields belonging to an atheist.  The church wasn’t air-conditioned and, in warm weather, had to have its windows open.  One spring, this atheist planted his fields on a Sunday, plowed and tended them especially on Sunday when the church was in session, and, finally, harvested them on a Sunday.   After he was done, he wrote to the editor of the local paper:  “I planted my fields on  Sunday, took care of them on Sunday, and harvested them on Sunday.  I didn’t pay any attention to god and I had a bumper crop this September!  What do you think about that?”  The editor printed the letter, but then answered, “My friend, God doesn’t settle His accounts in September.”

“God doesn’t settle His accounts in September.”  But He will settle them!

It is appointed to men to die once, but after this the judgment, Hebrews 9:27, emphasis added.

2. Light discovers.

You can see stuff in the light that is hidden in the darkness.  That’s why, almost invariably, when people go into a dark room, even a familiar one, they turn on the light.   In the same way, Scripture lights up the darkness of this world so that we can see things to avoid – or to receive.

I heard someone the other day who called Christians, “God’s flashlights.”  That’s not a bad analogy.  We’re here to shine in the darkness of this world, in order to guide people to the light of the Gospel.

3. Light can be overpowering.

When I was in Bible College, one of my fellow-students in the dorm, if I remember the wattage correctly, decided to get a 1000 watt light bulb.  It’s been over 50 years, but I remember vividly that when you walked into the room and turned on the light, it almost knocked you over, it was so bright.  Needless to say, the administration took a dim view of this and made him get a smaller bulb!

This is what happened to Saul of Tarsus as he was intent on wiping out the name of Jesus.  On the road to Damascus, with no thought of anything but that, he saw “a light from heaven, brighter than the Sun, shining around him and his party.  It turned him and his life completely around, to the point that he was preaching salvation through the very Name that he had just a day or so before tried to destroy!

He saw the Light and it overpowered him.

That’s what light does to the darkness.  It doesn’t negotiate with it.  It doesn’t try to “woo” it or reason with it.  It simply shines, and the darkness is gone!

4. Light isn’t always welcome.

God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved.

He who believes in Him is not condemned; but he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.  And this is the condemnation, that the light has come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil.  For everyone practicing evil hates the light and does not come to the light, lest his deeds should be exposed, John 3:17-20, emphasis added.

Men don’t like to be told they’re sinners, or that, apart from the Lord Jesus, they stand condemned in the sight of God.  They want to believe the devil’s lie that they’re all right.  As the saying was, a few years ago, “I’m ok, you’re ok.”  The problem is that, apart from the Lord Jesus Christ, I’m not ok, and neither are you.

The Lord Jesus has come and turned on the light!

What does it reveal?

Have folks come to the Light?

Or have they, like rats and roaches, scuttled back into the darkness?

Thank the Lord, many have indeed come to it, but many more have rejected it.

“Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven,”  Matthew 5;16.

“Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved,” Acts 16:31.

Placed on Purpose

For the tabernacle he made boards of acacia wood, standing upright.
……….
two sockets under each of the boards.
……….
And he made bars of acacia wood:  five for the boards on one side of the tabernacle, five bars for the boards on the other side of the tabernacle, and bars for the boards of the tabernacle on the far side westward.  And he made the middle bar to pass through the boards from one end to the other.  He overlaid the boards with gold, made their rings of gold to be holders for the bars, and overlaid the bars with gold, Exodus 36:20, 24, 31-34 NKJV. 

Our last post described some of the details of the boards which made up the tabernacle itself.  This framework was covered on the outside by several curtains.  Those individual boards and foundation sockets made up a single unit – the tabernacle.

This unity made up of individuals makes me think of another unity made up of individuals – the church.

What “unity”?

I’m thinking here of how it’s meant to be, not how it’s worked out.  Satan has indeed very successfully sown tares among the wheat, Matthew 13:25.

“The church” has nothing whatever to do with buildings.  The term is meant to describe the people who might meet in that building, but the building itself is irrelevant.

Scripture describes the church as both an organism – the body of Christ – and an organizationthe assembly.  The body is described in 1 Corinthians 12:12, 13,

For as the [human] body is one and has many members, but all the members of that one body, being many, are one, so also is Christ.  For by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body…. 

This is the “organism,” and there’s only one.

Our son-in-law has opportunity to minister overseas occasionally, in fact, he and our daughter are over there right now.  Some of the people from there have been able to visit here.  We met them.  Never met them before and probably will never meet them again in this life, but there was a kinship between us, nevertheless.  We are all members of “the body.”

This one worldwide organism is expressed in many, many local organizations: the local church:  the ekklesia, the assembly.  Great confusion and harm has been done to the cause of Christ because this distinction has been ignored or rejected.  There is no worldwide organization in Scripture, not to mention any names, no “world-wide church,” no denominational hierarchy, no “headquarters.” 

There’s just the local assembly.  

So, what does all this have to do with the tabernacle?

Just the idea of many boards making up one building.

In addition to 1 Corinthians 12:12, 13, Paul put it like this:

There are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit.  There are differences of ministries, but the same Lord.  And there are diversities of activities, but it is the same God who works all in all.

If the foot should say, “Because I am not a hand, I am not of the body,” is it therefore not of the body?  And if the ear should say, “Because I am not an eye, I am not of the body,” is it therefore not of the body?  If the whole body were an eye, where would be the hearing?  If the whole were hearing, where would be the smelling?  But now God has set the members, each one of them, in the body just as He pleased, 1 Corinthians 12:4-6,15-18 NKJV.

The point is, no single board was unnecessary.  Each board had its place and function.  Likewise, no single believer is unnecessary.  Each believer has his or her own place and function.  Don’t miss the fact that Paul said, God has set the members, each one of them, in the body just as He pleased, emphasis added.

It isn’t “hit or miss.”

It’s not just about Sunday, either.

It’s about Monday and Tuesday and Wednesday and Thursday and Friday and Saturday, too.

It’s not without reason that believers are called light and salt.  We’re supposed to have an influence on the world around us.  That’s part of our place and purpose.  Politicians may tell us that it’s “alright” to be Christians in church on Sunday, but not the rest of the week, but the whole point of God saving us isn’t just so we can go to heaven when we die, but that we might have an effect, an influence, on the world in which we live.

This world needs Christian plumbers as well as Christian pastors, perhaps more.  It needs Christian store clerks and warehousemen and accountants and gas station attendants.

It needs people who will tell the clerk when she’s given them back too much change.

That’s our place.

Our purpose.

Blood and Water

As I was mulling over the title for this post, I was not thinking of 1 John 1, though I did think of it immediately after.  The title comes from the two items in the courtyard of the tabernacle:  the bronze altar and the laver.  It is these I was thinking about with the title.  In our last post, we talked about entering the courtyard, something there’s no evidence that the ordinary Israelite could do.  He had business at the bronze altar if he had a sacrifice, and he could probably see the bronze laver, but he couldn’t approach it.

We want to look more closely at these two items ourselves as we journey inward.

The Bronze Altar

In Leviticus 1, we read part of God’s instruction to Moses about the various sacrifices:

“If his offering is a burnt sacrifice of the herd, let him offer a male without blemish; he shall offer it of his own free will at the door of the tabernacle of meeting before the LORD.  Then he shall put his hand on the head of the burnt offering, and it will be accepted on his behalf to make atonement for him.  He shall kill the bull before the LORD; and the priests, Aaron’s sons, shall bring the blood and sprinkle the blood all around the altar that is by the door of the tabernacle of meeting,” Leviticus 1:3-6 NKJV.

By the way and simply because I’ve heard it used like this:  the expression his free will” is not making a doctrinal statement about man’s will; it simply means that the offering was voluntary, as opposed to those offerings which were required.

These verses tell us that the one bringing the sacrifice was not a passive onlooker to what was going on, but he was an active participant.  At the least, he had to put his hand on the head of the animal being sacrificed, and the text reads as though he had to kill it, v. 4.  The text down through v. 8 indicates he might also have had parts in the other proceedings.  We’ll stay with some thoughts about v. 4.

He put his hand on the head of the animal.  Doing so, the man was identifying with the animal as the one atoning for the man’s sin.  The man was saying, in effect, “I deserve to die, but you are taking my place.  You are my substitute.”

He also, it seems, had to kill the animal.  In this, the man was saying, “I’m killing you; my sin is killing you.  You are my sacrifice.”

Substitution.

Sacrifice.

Two essential elements in the OT sacrificial system.

Two essential elements in the death of the Lord Jesus.

I asked a fellow once, “What did Jesus do on the Cross?”

Beside the fact that Jesus died, the fellow didn’t seem to have very much idea.

The simple fact is that Christ died for sin, not His own because He had none, but for the sin of others.  He took their place.  As the animal died instead of the individual Israelite, so the Lord died in place of individual sinners.  He was their Substitute.

The Israelite was guilty of sin.  So are we, and the wages of sin is death, Romans 3:23.  The animal was sacrificed to take his place.  We are guilty of sin and death is our reward, both physically and spiritually, if we die without the Lord Jesus as our Redeemer and Savior.  We will die physically unless the Lord comes back before then.  If you’ve recently lost a loved one, I’m sorry.  I don’t mean to add to your grief.

And apart from the Lord Jesus, we are already “dead in trespasses and sins,” Ephesians 2:1, already “dead spiritually.”  And apart from the Lord Jesus, we are already guilty before God.  The common idea that we’ll have to wait until the Judgment to find out our “fate” is false; it’s already set – apart from the Lord Jesus:

He who believes in Him is not condemned; but he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God, John 3:18 emphasis added.

He who believes in the Son has everlasting life; and he who does not believe the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God abides on him, John 3:36 emphasis added.

Not “the love of God,” as so often and falsely taught today, but the wrath of God.

Only in the Lord Jesus does one have any “claim” on the love of God.  Apart from Him, there is only wrath.

Apart from the Lord Jesus, there is no hope and no future.  There is no “better place.”

He is our Substitute, our Sacrifice.

The second item of furniture in the courtyard was the laver, for the daily and continual cleansing of the priests as they went about their duties.

We, too, though forgiven, also need daily cleansing from the increasing pollution and filth of this world.  As the Israelite was made unclean just by contact with things which were unclean, so we, in contact with this world, are made unclean by its actions and philosophies and need to be cleansed.

Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved, Acts 16:31.

If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness, 1 John 1:9.

Entering the Courtyard

“You shall make a veil woven of blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine woven linen, Exodus 26:31.

“You shall make a screen for the door of the tabernacle…, Exodus 26:36.

“For the gate of the court there shall be a screen twenty cubits long…, Exodus 27:16, NKJV.

Three doors, in our reading, starting with God and working outward.  We’ve talked about this in earlier posts.  God starts at one end, with His grace and His mercy, but we have to start at the other end, because we’re on the outside, as Paul tells us in Ephesians 2:12, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel and strangers from the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world.

A writer of an earlier generation, I. M. Haldeman, suggested that these three doors represent Jesus’ saying, “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life.”

That may be, but I think the Apostle John had the right idea in 1 John 2:12-13a:

12.  I write to you, little children,
Because your sins are forgiven you for His name’s sake.

13. I write to you, fathers,
Because you have know Him who is from the beginning.
I write to you, young men,
Because you have overcome the wicked one. 

In these two verses, John addresses three groups:  little children, young men and fathers, and he counsels and advises each group.  Three groups:  three stages of human development from babe to adult.

I think this is something of what we have symbolically in the tabernacle, a picture of development and growth in our Christian life.

Now, the ordinary Israelite knew nothing of this.  He had no idea that the very real things happening to him and his nation were “examples,” as Paul put it much later:  Now all these things happened to them as examples, and they were written for our admonition,…, 1 Corinthians 10:11.

They were very real to him, things that actually happened, but to us they are being used as object lessons, to the intent that we should not lust after evil things as they also lusted,  1 Corinthians 10:6.

There’s nothing that indicates the Israelite himself was able, when he brought a sacrifice, to go any further into the courtyard than the entrance where the bronze altar was.  Only the priest had access beyond that point.  Though there were age and other requirements, it was his life and responsibility.

On the other hand, according to the book of Hebrews, as believers, we have the right and the privilege to go as far into the tabernacle, symbolically speaking, as we can, by the grace and mercy of God.

The new believer, as it were, enters the courtyard where the bronze altar and the laver are.  These represent the Cross of our Lord and our cleansing from the guilt and power of sin.  It’s a time of rejoicing as the weight of guilt is gone.

Though it wasn’t yesterday by any means, I can still remember as though it were, that time when the Lord brought me out of the darkness of sin into the light of His grace and mercy.  I thought I was saved.  I’d “gone forward” in a special service at the church my Grandmother attended when I was staying with her during summers, services led by one of Billy Graham’s associates, Mordecai Ham.  When I was home, I never went to church.   I remember being baptized and nearly drowning, or so it seemed to me.  Right after that, I did something Grandma didn’t like and she made me go forward again, not to be saved, but just to make it right, I suppose.  I was nine years old.  Grandma was a teacher of the little old ladies at her church and she made me listen to the radio preachers of the day:  M.R.DeHaan, “First Mate Bob” and the crew of “the Good Ship Grace,” and some others; those are the two I remember.  That was all the spiritual training I had as a kid.

Time passed.  We won’t go into detail.

One day at work, one of the guys invited me to church.  That was the last place I wanted to go.  He kept after me and finally I went, just to shut him up!  Funny thing, I never “went forward” or “prayed the prayer,” or any of the number of things folks talk about today, but I know as certainly as I’m sitting here in my recliner typing this post on this old, beat up laptop that the Lord met me there and rescued me.  He changed me, cleaned me up and sent me to Bible College.

It was a time of light and rejoicing.  I remember one of the supervisors at work commenting about my friend and me, that it seemed like “a young people’s meeting.”  I was a changed man.

That was 1963.

That was my experience at the entrance to the courtyard.

Next post:  Blood And Water.