Placed on Purpose

For the tabernacle he made boards of acacia wood, standing upright.
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two sockets under each of the boards.
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And he made bars of acacia wood:  five for the boards on one side of the tabernacle, five bars for the boards on the other side of the tabernacle, and bars for the boards of the tabernacle on the far side westward.  And he made the middle bar to pass through the boards from one end to the other.  He overlaid the boards with gold, made their rings of gold to be holders for the bars, and overlaid the bars with gold, Exodus 36:20, 24, 31-34 NKJV. 

Our last post described some of the details of the boards which made up the tabernacle itself.  This framework was covered on the outside by several curtains.  Those individual boards and foundation sockets made up a single unit – the tabernacle.

This unity made up of individuals makes me think of another unity made up of individuals – the church.

What “unity”?

I’m thinking here of how it’s meant to be, not how it’s worked out.  Satan has indeed very successfully sown tares among the wheat, Matthew 13:25.

“The church” has nothing whatever to do with buildings.  The term is meant to describe the people who might meet in that building, but the building itself is irrelevant.

Scripture describes the church as both an organism – the body of Christ – and an organizationthe assembly.  The body is described in 1 Corinthians 12:12, 13,

For as the [human] body is one and has many members, but all the members of that one body, being many, are one, so also is Christ.  For by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body…. 

This is the “organism,” and there’s only one.

Our son-in-law has opportunity to minister overseas occasionally, in fact, he and our daughter are over there right now.  Some of the people from there have been able to visit here.  We met them.  Never met them before and probably will never meet them again in this life, but there was a kinship between us, nevertheless.  We are all members of “the body.”

This one worldwide organism is expressed in many, many local organizations: the local church:  the ekklesia, the assembly.  Great confusion and harm has been done to the cause of Christ because this distinction has been ignored or rejected.  There is no worldwide organization in Scripture, not to mention any names, no “world-wide church,” no denominational hierarchy, no “headquarters.” 

There’s just the local assembly.  

So, what does all this have to do with the tabernacle?

Just the idea of many boards making up one building.

In addition to 1 Corinthians 12:12, 13, Paul put it like this:

There are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit.  There are differences of ministries, but the same Lord.  And there are diversities of activities, but it is the same God who works all in all.

If the foot should say, “Because I am not a hand, I am not of the body,” is it therefore not of the body?  And if the ear should say, “Because I am not an eye, I am not of the body,” is it therefore not of the body?  If the whole body were an eye, where would be the hearing?  If the whole were hearing, where would be the smelling?  But now God has set the members, each one of them, in the body just as He pleased, 1 Corinthians 12:4-6,15-18 NKJV.

The point is, no single board was unnecessary.  Each board had its place and function.  Likewise, no single believer is unnecessary.  Each believer has his or her own place and function.  Don’t miss the fact that Paul said, God has set the members, each one of them, in the body just as He pleased, emphasis added.

It isn’t “hit or miss.”

It’s not just about Sunday, either.

It’s about Monday and Tuesday and Wednesday and Thursday and Friday and Saturday, too.

It’s not without reason that believers are called light and salt.  We’re supposed to have an influence on the world around us.  That’s part of our place and purpose.  Politicians may tell us that it’s “alright” to be Christians in church on Sunday, but not the rest of the week, but the whole point of God saving us isn’t just so we can go to heaven when we die, but that we might have an effect, an influence, on the world in which we live.

This world needs Christian plumbers as well as Christian pastors, perhaps more.  It needs Christian store clerks and warehousemen and accountants and gas station attendants.

It needs people who will tell the clerk when she’s given them back too much change.

That’s our place.

Our purpose.