Hebrews 2:5-9, “Not Yet”

In these verses, the writer gives the final “proof” of the superiority of the Lord Jesus over angels:  they have not been given authority over “the world to come.”  We’ll look at all these verses in a minute or so.  For now, the words “not yet” are some of the most precious in the Word, at least to my thinking.  As I look at the moral and spiritual deterioration of our world and the chaos that seems to be enveloping it on every level, these words give me hope that there is something better coming.

As I look in the mirror, the one on the wall or the one in the Word (James 1:23), and see the faults and failures it shows, these words give me hope that something better is coming.  The Word itself gives me that assurance:  Beloved, now we are the children of God, and it has not yet been revealed what we shall be, but we know that when He is revealed, we shall be like Him, for we shall see Him as He is, 1 John 3:2 (emphasis added).

Outside, the weather is starting to cool down a little, a taste of what is to come in a few weeks and putting an end to the promise of Spring, when the earth struggles to shake off the deadness of winter and bring forth that life and abundance the Scripture speaks of in Amos 9:13, “Behold, the days are coming,” says the LORD, “when the plowman shall overtake the reaper, and the treader of grapes him who sows seed; the mountains shall drip with sweet wine, and all the hills shall flow with it.” 

And Paul wrote that the earnest expectation of the creation eagerly waits for the revealing of the sons of God.  For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of Him who subjected it in hope; because the creation itself will be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God.  For we know that the whole creation groans and labors with birth pangs together until now, Romans 8:19-22.

“The days are coming,” when that “earnest expectation” and “groaning” will be satisfied, but “not yet.”

Even for our Lord, there is a “not yet,” Hebrews 2:8.  While it might perhaps be said that this verse refers to man himself and God’s original intent that man be His vice-regent over creation, Genesis 1:26-28, still Hebrews 2:8 refers to our Lord’s kingdom.

There is a lot of discussion about that kingdom.  There are many ways in which that kingdom is viewed, but Scripture prophesies a time when God will make new heavens and a new earth, a time in which human life will be greatly extended.  At the same time, there will still be sin and death, Isaiah 65:17-25. Though some folks pair verse 17 with Revelation 21:1, Isaiah and John do not speak of the same event.

Revelation has something to say about this.  Describing the return of our Lord, Revelation 19 says, Now I saw heaven opened, and behold, a white horse.  And He who sat on it was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness He judges and makes war.  His eyes were like a flame of fire, and on His head were many crowns.  He had a name written that no one knew except Himself.  He was clothed with a robe dipped in blood, and His name is called The Word of God.  And the armies in heaven, clothed in fine linen, white and clean, followed him on white horses.  Now out of His mouth goes a sharp sword, that with it He should strike the nations.  And He Himself will rule them with a rod of iron, Revelation 19:11-15.

We’re all familiar with Revelation 20 and its declaration of our Lord’s reign of 1000 years.  Many teachers and scholars, following the early Church fathers, say that this can’t possibly refer to an actual 1000 years.  However, the anti-Semitism of the early fathers is well-documented.  They simply could not accept that Israel had any further blessing coming, since she had rejected and crucified her Messiah.  They and those who follow them say that God is done with her.  However, it’s through that very rejection and crucifixion that the way was paved for Israel’s eventual restoration, to say nothing of the fact that the Gospel was given to us Gentiles.  Further, I believe there is a reason why the Holy Spirit led John to write a thousand years 6 times in 6 verses.  It’s to impress on us that He means 1000 years, and not just some vague period of time.  Isaiah 65 refers to this time.  Revelation 21 describes eternity.

Revelation 20 gives us the length of that kingdom.  Revelation 19 describes its character.  The word translated “rule” in 19:15 is interesting.  It’s isn’t the usual word used of ruling, but means “to shepherd.”  It gives the same thought as the word used by our Lord in John 10 as He describes His care of His sheep. So, Revelation 19 tells us that He’s going to “shepherd” the nations.  They’re not going to like it, based on the fact that His rule will be with “a rod of iron.”  Zechariah 14 gives some more details about this.  Hence, the sinner being a hundred years old shall be accursed, Isaiah 65:20.

But “not yet.”  Where is there a nation on this earth that truly seeks to live by the Word of God and to honor and obey the Lord Jesus?  That can’t even be said of a lot of churches anymore.

But why is it – “not yet.”

Because our Lord didn’t come the first time to reign, but to redeem.  This is what Hebrews 2:5-9 is telling us.

God’s original intent in creation was that man was to be His administrator, as it were, over this new planet and all it contained.  However, man rebelled against this idea and decided that he would be the boss.  The result is that not only doesn’t man have dominion over this world, he doesn’t even have dominion over himself.

Lord willing, We’ll have more to say about this in our next post.

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“…on earth…”

This is a follow-up to my last post, in which I asked the question, “In praying ‘thy kingdom come,’ what are we praying for?”  In that post, I connected the request for the coming of the kingdom to the request that God’s will be done on earth in the same way that it is done in heaven.  In other words, isn’t praying for the kingdom praying for something that happens or will happen on the earth?

I understand that there is a lot of discussion about “the kingdom.”  Some simply cannot accept the idea of what they consider to be “an earthly, carnal, political” kingdom.  According to these folks, it’s a “spiritual kingdom,” that is, the rule of Christ in the hearts of His people.  It’s already happening, because He’s ruling in Heaven.  But that in itself is nothing new.  “Relationship with God,” as it’s called today, has always been about God’s rule in the lives of people.  Even under the Law, obedience was the prime requisite, and disobedience was severely punished.

As far as the “earthly, carnal, political” part is concerned:  I’ve never been able to understand why it’s alright for the Lord Jesus to sit on a throne in Heaven, but not for Him to sit on a throne in Jerusalem.  What difference does it make WHERE the throne is?  It’s about the Occupant, not what He’s sitting on, or where!  For my own part, I’d much rather have Him, say, in the White House than its current occupant – or any of its previous occupants.

It seems to me to be a great insult to our Lord to say that an “earthly” kingdom of His would be “carnal” and/or “political.”  Scripture says that His scepter, His royal insignia, is a scepter of righteousness, Psalm 45:6; Hebrews 1:8.

We just recently completed elections here in the US.  But when the Lord sets up His kingdom, there won’t be any campaigning.  There won’t be any signs out in the front yard or any TV commercials.  There won’t be any of the back room deals or the wheeling and dealing associated with current politics.  There won’t be a Democrat or Republican or Libertarian or Green or Prohibition party.  [Yes, there used to be a Prohibition Party candidate on the ballot in Colorado, long after Prohibition itself was gone.]   There won’t be any voting about it.  Daniel 2:44 says, the God of heaven will set up a kingdom….  And there won’t be any focus groups or polls about how He should do it!

Yes, but didn’t our Lord say that His kingdom was not of this world, John 18:36?  I don’t know how many times I’ve heard that from the pulpit or read it as a “proof” that there will be no “earthly” kingdom.  But clearly, the Lord was talking about the source of the kingdom, not where it will be located or operate.  He said this Himself in a part of v. 36 that’s never quoted, “My kingdom is not from here.”  Otherwise, He said, His disciples would fight.  But the kingdom God will set up will not be set up in any manner remotely similar to other earthly kingdoms.

Furthermore, the Lord Jesus said that He Himself was not of this world, John 8:23.  He said that of His disciples, John 15:19.  Yet, clearly, He and they were located and functioned, physically and actually, in this world.

In the New Testament, there are a couple of clear references to the reign of our Lord as over more than just some ephemeral something that has no relationship to this world.  In Revelation 19:15, after a brief description of our Lord’s return to this earth in vs. 11-14, we read, Now out of His mouth goes a sharp sword, that with it He should strike the nations.  And He Himself will rule them with a rod of iron.  If the kingdom is only related to believers, why then is “a rod of iron” necessary?  And who are the nations whom He will “strike” as well as “rule”?  Certainly not believers.  The word translated “rule” means “to shepherd,” i.e., John is saying that Jesus will shepherd the nations.  This seems to me to be a far cry from the idea that He will return, officiate at the final judgment and then usher in eternity.  For an idea of what His return and rule entails, read Zechariah 14.  We’ve done a couple of posts on that chapter.

Revelation 20, which continues ch. 19, indicates this “shepherding” will last for 1000 years.  And, yes, I’m aware of the uproar over that figure.  As one Reformed writer put it, the thousand years simply refer to the present Gospel age of 2000 years (!)  However, it seems to me that the Holy Spirit had a reason for inspiring John to write 1000 years six times in six verses.  Perhaps it was  to impress on us that He meant 1000 years, not just some indeterminate period of time.

He shall rule them with a rod of iron.

Psalm 110:2 says that Messiah will rule in the midst of His enemies.  Where is this happening today?  What kind of a king is it who rules “in the midst of His enemies,” and they don’t know it, but continue to reject, ridicule and rebel against Him? When our Lord sits on the throne of His glory, Matthew 19:28, that will not be possible.

There is so much more that we could say on this subject, but have decided to save it for other posts.  Also, we recognize that there are many good, earnest Christians who differ with us on these subjects.  Further, we recognize that the subject of “prophecy” is not considered “a fundamental of the faith” by many, not worth “fighting over” or causing controversy.  While we do believe that one’s view of prophecy doesn’t determine or deny their salvation, we also believe that it is important and not to be neglected or ignored.  After all, assuming we believe in divine inspiration and not that the Bible is just a miscellaneous collection of ancient writings, written long after the events they describe, the Holy Spirit saw fit to give it to us.  We should try to know as much about it as possible. 

…Continued

My last post, which was also the last post of 2013, was about TV shows which had been cancelled or shows which had been brought to a conclusion and so were finished. As things developed, though I was wrong, I thought that post might also be the concluding post for this blog. I have been pleasantly surprised by the number of views which the blog has continued to receive, even though there has been no new post for about six weeks.  Also, I have been amazed at the number of views a particular post has received.  My post on the daughters of Zelophedad has received 50 views just this week.

That last post of 2013 mentioned three shows, not by name, that were ending, or so I thought.  We’ll still never know what happened to “A” and “B” and the show that concluded satisfactorily has still concluded satisfactorily.  However, the third show, I was surprised to discover today, has a new season on Netflix.

Thinking about all this, I decided that these shows are a little like life, not that TV ever shows anything truly life-like, especially “reality shows.”  But some things turn out satisfactorily, some things don’t, and there are “surprises” quite often, like we recently had here at home when the furnace and the hot water heater both went on the fritz at the same time. 😦

We live in an age of increasing skepticism.  Traditional, that is, Christian, beliefs and morals have largely been jettisoned.  The Bible is illegal in schools and government [at least here in the US], and we’re pretty much just circling the drain.  Even many churches don’t really believe the Bible to be the Word of God.  They’re quite willing to “dialogue” with other religions which deny or contradict Biblical teaching.

Many people deny any such thing as an “afterlife”:  “Once you’re dead, you’re dead. There’s nothing beyond the grave.”  Believing that, many people spend their lives trying to find some “meaning” to their otherwise drab lives.

In contrast to this view, the Bible clearly teaches that “…it is appointed for men once to die, but after this the judgment,” Hebrews 9:27.  In other words, there is something beyond death and the grave.

There is some discussion among Biblical teachers about what the Bible says about judgment.  That discussion isn’t important here.  The point is, there IS judgment coming!  Revelation 20:11-15 graphically portrays it:

Then I saw a great white throne and Him who sat on it, from whose face earth and heaven fled away.  And there was found no place for them.  And I saw the dead, small and great [that is, whether famous or unknown], standing before God, and books were opened.  And the dead were judged according to their works, by the things which were written in the books.  The sea gave up the dead which were in it, and Death and Hades gave up the dead which were in them.  And they were judged, each one according to their works.  Then Death and Hades were cast into the lake of fire.  This is the second death.  And anyone not found written in the Book of Life was cast into the lake of fire.  

This is not a favorite portion of Scripture.  Many people simply cannot agree with the idea that a “God of love” would do such a thing.  However, the God of Scripture isn’t the God of popular thought.  He is a God of righteousness, justice and holiness – as well as “love.”  Sin must be punished.  Sin will be punished.

One of the local TV stations has a news segment on “cold cases,” that is, crimes which have never been solved.  There are several TV shows with this as their theme – the solving of “cold cases.”  There will be no “cold cases” in eternity.  Every murder, every rape, ever crime, will finally be “solved.”  Those who have “gotten away with it” in this life, whether because they were never found or because of some legal maneuvering, will discover that they didn’t really get away with it.  Those who are guilty of gross or multiple crimes – like a Hitler or Stalin – which human justice really can’t adequately deal with, will discover that there is One who can.

We will finally find out, so to speak, what happened to “A” and “B”.

Yes, but not everybody is guilty of some crime or other.  That is true, however, we are all guilty of sin.  We may not have broken man’s law – we always drive the speed limit – but we have broken God’s law.  I doubt there’s a single person alive who would say that they have ALWAYS lived as they think they should.  If that’s true of us in our own sight, how much more is it true of us in God’s sight?

The issue in Revelation 20 isn’t whether or not one is “good” enough to make it into heaven, but whether or not one’s name is in the “Book of Life.”  Those whose names are there have repented of their sins and trusted the Lord Jesus Christ for salvation. They haven’t joined the church or been baptized or done a hundred of the other things men say must be done in order to be saved; they have simply rested on who the Lord Jesus was and what He did for sinners.  In short, they have “believed.”  They, and they alone, will enter heaven.

Hebrews 9:27, which we quoted above, also says, Christ was offered once to bear the sins of many.  In other words, He endured the punishment sinners ought to endure.  He paid the price for their sins, though He had none of His own.  Indeed, if He would have had sins of His own, He could never have paid for the sins of others.  But He lived a perfect and sinless life.  That perfect life is credited to those who believe, because we have no such perfection of our own and can never achieve it.  That is the only way we will ever “make it” into heaven.  His is the only goodness, or righteousness, that God will accept.  His is the only payment that can ever be made for sins.  We could never pay for even one of our own sins, let alone the myriad of them of which we are guilty.

Though there is much more I could say about all this, I’ll close with this.  There is a “new season” beyond the grave.  Are you ready for it?