Within the Veil

“You shall make a veil woven of blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine woven linen.  It shall be woven with an artistic design of cherubim.  You shall hang it upon the four pillars of acacia wood overlaid with gold.  Their hooks shall be gold, upon four sockets of silver.  And you shall hang the veil from the clasps.  Then you shall bring the ark of the Testimony in there, behind the veil.  The veil shall be a divider for you between the holy place and the Most Holy,” Exodus 26:31-33 NKJV.

And he made a veil of blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine woven linen; it was worked with an artistic design of cherubim.  He made for it four pillars of acacia wood, and overlaid them with gold, with their hooks of gold; and he cast four sockets of silver for them, Exodus 36:35-36 NKJV.

And Jesus cried out again with a loud voice, and yielded up His spirit.
Then behold, the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom,
Matthew 27:50- 51 NKJV.

Therefore, brethren, having boldness to enter the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way which He consecrated for us, through the veil, that is, His flesh, Hebrews 10:19-20 NKJV .

The two references in Exodus describe the instructions for and the construction of the second veil, which separated the two compartments of the tabernacle.  The first veil covered the entrance into the tabernacle itself.  The vast majority of Israelites never saw the inside of the tabernacle, let alone dare to enter it.  Only the priests, under very limited circumstances, had that privilege.  But even they would never have dared push aside the second veil to enter the Most Holy Place.  Among them, only the High Priest, a direct descendant of Aaron, had that privilege, but even he only one time in the year, on the Day of Atonement.  So afraid were the others that it’s said that a rope was tied around his waist just in case he died for some reason while performing his duties, so that the others could pull his body out to where they could get to it for burial.

The third verse occurred at the Crucifixion as our Lord had completed His sacrifice for sinners like us.  After He yielded up His spirit, Matthew reports that the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom.  Granted, this was the veil in Herod’s temple and not in the original tabernacle, but the significance is still the same.  Keep in mind also, this veil was not some cheap, simple curtain, easily ripped.  It’s reported that it was about a hand-breadth, that is, about five inches, thick, and carefully and intricately woven.  No mere human strength could have made a dent in it, let alone tear it in two.

And it was torn in two from top to bottom, indication of something more than a human action.  Now, it’s true that the priests patched it up and their various rituals continued for another 40 years until the Romans finally put a stop to everything by destroying the Temple and pretty much the nation itself, which disappeared from history until its reappearance in 1948.  Nor have we heard the last of her, political agitating notwithstanding.  Israel will yet blossom and bud, And fill the face of the world with fruit, Isaiah 27:6.

These veils teach us some lessons.

The first veils were in the tabernacle, a building given to Israel by God.  Entrance through them was very limited, though Israel otherwise was given blessings not given to other nations.

In spite of those blessings, she stands as an object lesson that no number of merely external things is enough to bring true understanding of the things of God.  Moses commented on this.

In Deuteronomy 29:2-3, he said to Israel, “You have seen all that the LORD did before your eyes in the land of Egypt, to Pharaoh and to all his servants and to all his land – the great trials which your eyes have seen, the signs, and those great wonders.  And he relates their further experiences:  how their clothing hadn’t worn out and their food had been miraculously provided for forty years, vs. 5, 6.  But in between those two statements, he makes this solemn declaration:  “But the LORD has not given you a heart to perceive and eyes to see and ears to hear, to this very day,” v. 4.

All that Israel had, and yet how quickly and how often she turned away from the God who had so richly blessed her and acted just like the nations she had replaced.  Indeed, she was worse than they, because she knew better.  Except for a small minority of individuals, she didn’t care.

The veil was there to symbolize that they had no direct access to God, but had to go through ritual and sacrifice and priesthood.

But the veil has been torn in two.  The humblest believer may now come into the presence of God on his or her own behalf and on behalf of others.  And we may do that boldly.  This means that we have liberty and permission to do so.  His door is never closed.  But I’m afraid that, too often, God is more willing to receive us than we are enter His presence.  We’re too busy, too caught up in the everyday things of life and of making a living.  And we live in a world that increasingly denies and rejects the God of the Bible.  I’m afraid that we haven’t seen anything yet.

In spite of all that, and of our own failings and faults, let us…

Enter into His gates with thanksgiving, And into His courts with praise.  Be thankful to Him, and bless His name, Psalm 100:4.

May God grant it, for Jesus’ sake.

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Entering the Courtyard

“You shall make a veil woven of blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine woven linen, Exodus 26:31.

“You shall make a screen for the door of the tabernacle…, Exodus 26:36.

“For the gate of the court there shall be a screen twenty cubits long…, Exodus 27:16, NKJV.

Three doors, in our reading, starting with God and working outward.  We’ve talked about this in earlier posts.  God starts at one end, with His grace and His mercy, but we have to start at the other end, because we’re on the outside, as Paul tells us in Ephesians 2:12, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel and strangers from the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world.

A writer of an earlier generation, I. M. Haldeman, suggested that these three doors represent Jesus’ saying, “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life.”

That may be, but I think the Apostle John had the right idea in 1 John 2:12-13a:

12.  I write to you, little children,
Because your sins are forgiven you for His name’s sake.

13. I write to you, fathers,
Because you have know Him who is from the beginning.
I write to you, young men,
Because you have overcome the wicked one. 

In these two verses, John addresses three groups:  little children, young men and fathers, and he counsels and advises each group.  Three groups:  three stages of human development from babe to adult.

I think this is something of what we have symbolically in the tabernacle, a picture of development and growth in our Christian life.

Now, the ordinary Israelite knew nothing of this.  He had no idea that the very real things happening to him and his nation were “examples,” as Paul put it much later:  Now all these things happened to them as examples, and they were written for our admonition,…, 1 Corinthians 10:11.

They were very real to him, things that actually happened, but to us they are being used as object lessons, to the intent that we should not lust after evil things as they also lusted,  1 Corinthians 10:6.

There’s nothing that indicates the Israelite himself was able, when he brought a sacrifice, to go any further into the courtyard than the entrance where the bronze altar was.  Only the priest had access beyond that point.  Though there were age and other requirements, it was his life and responsibility.

On the other hand, according to the book of Hebrews, as believers, we have the right and the privilege to go as far into the tabernacle, symbolically speaking, as we can, by the grace and mercy of God.

The new believer, as it were, enters the courtyard where the bronze altar and the laver are.  These represent the Cross of our Lord and our cleansing from the guilt and power of sin.  It’s a time of rejoicing as the weight of guilt is gone.

Though it wasn’t yesterday by any means, I can still remember as though it were, that time when the Lord brought me out of the darkness of sin into the light of His grace and mercy.  I thought I was saved.  I’d “gone forward” in a special service at the church my Grandmother attended when I was staying with her during summers, services led by one of Billy Graham’s associates, Mordecai Ham.  When I was home, I never went to church.   I remember being baptized and nearly drowning, or so it seemed to me.  Right after that, I did something Grandma didn’t like and she made me go forward again, not to be saved, but just to make it right, I suppose.  I was nine years old.  Grandma was a teacher of the little old ladies at her church and she made me listen to the radio preachers of the day:  M.R.DeHaan, “First Mate Bob” and the crew of “the Good Ship Grace,” and some others; those are the two I remember.  That was all the spiritual training I had as a kid.

Time passed.  We won’t go into detail.

One day at work, one of the guys invited me to church.  That was the last place I wanted to go.  He kept after me and finally I went, just to shut him up!  Funny thing, I never “went forward” or “prayed the prayer,” or any of the number of things folks talk about today, but I know as certainly as I’m sitting here in my recliner typing this post on this old, beat up laptop that the Lord met me there and rescued me.  He changed me, cleaned me up and sent me to Bible College.

It was a time of light and rejoicing.  I remember one of the supervisors at work commenting about my friend and me, that it seemed like “a young people’s meeting.”  I was a changed man.

That was 1963.

That was my experience at the entrance to the courtyard.

Next post:  Blood And Water.

“Fine Woven Linen, and Blue, Purple, and Scarlet Thread”

“…ten curtains of fine woven linen and blue, purple, and scarlet thread,” Exodus 26:1.

“blue, purple, scarlet thread, and fine woven linen, Exodus 36:37 NKJV.

Though we’ve mentioned these items in other posts, we want to look at just them in this post.  The linen was the main item out of which the tabernacle was constructed, but it was embroidered with thread of these three colors.

Now, what do, or could, these four items suggest when it comes to the study of the Lord Jesus Christ, of whom the tabernacle speaks in type and shadow?

Linen, blue, purple, scarlet?

With just a couple of exceptions in Paul’s writings, where do we find information about the Lord and His life in Scripture?

Is it not in the four gospels:  Matthew, Mark, Luke and John?

Why four?  Why not five, or ten or fifteen?

Because that’s what God wanted.

What is especially interesting about these four men is that each and every one of them was absolutely unqualified to write about the life of Christ.

God used them anyway….

Matthew, though Jewish himself, was a tax-collector for the hated Romans.  Jews would have considered him a traitor.  Yet God used him to write of their Messiah-King, who would deliver them from a far worse bondage than Rome.

Mark, that one who left Paul and Barnabas and their endeavors to go back home, was used by God to write of the Servant-Son, who finished what He started.

Luke, educated, polished, likely the “best” of the lot, humanly speaking, but, still, a Gentile:  with no part in the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world, Ephesians 2:12.  Nevertheless, God used him to know and to write about the Ideal, the Perfect Man, sent not only to Israel, but to gather His sheep out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation, Revelation 5:9.

John, a rough-and-tumble fisherman, using simple grammar to tell his story.  Beginning students in Greek use his Gospel in their first attempts at translation.  Simple words, uncomplicated grammar, expressing truths which 2000 years of study have not yet begun to fathom.

If we adapt Pilate’s exclamation about the Lord Jesus to that hostile crowd prior to our Lord’s crucifixion (John 19:5), we might come up with the following:

Matthew:  “Behold the Sovereign!”  He wrote to the Jews of their Messiah, their King.

Mark:   “Behold the Servant!”  To the Roman mind, which looked down on servants and serving, he wrote of Jesus, “the Servant of Jehovah.”

Luke:  “Behold the Sympathetic!”  He addressed the Greek viewpoint, present Jesus as Ideal Man.  As such, his is the “human interest” Gospel.

John:  “Behold the Son!”  John wrote to Christians, to declare and defend “God manifest in the flesh.”  In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and, [literally] God was the Word, emphasizing the deity of our Lord.

Boiling the distinctives of each Gospel down to one word:

Matthew is the Gospel of Christ’s Authority.  Cf. 7:24-29, especially v. 29; 28:18.

Mark is the Gospel of Christ’s Activity.  He records only one instance of teaching and four parables, but eighteen miracles.

Luke is the Gospel of Christ’s Availability.  Though there were times when Jesus withdrew from the crowds, yet, through Luke, He brings “good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people,” 2:10.

John is the Gospel of Christ’s Antiquity.  The prologue, 1:1-18, isn’t the only place where John states the eternal dignity and existence of the Word.  He quotes Jesus Himself as doing so.  In 8:58, Jesus said to them, “Most assuredly I say to you, before Abraham was, I AM.”
Unbelievers today may deny that Jesus ever claimed to be God, but those Jews who heard Him make that statement knew exactly what He was claiming.  That’s why they tried to kill Him on the spot – and that fact that He was telling the truth was why they couldn’t.
Ultimately, that’s why Jesus was crucified.  In the so-called “trials” of Him, all four of the Gospels record that the scribes and Pharisees, the leaders of the people, recognized what Jesus claimed:  Matthew 26:63-65; Mark 14:60-62; Luke 22:66-71; John 19:7.   And, apparently, one of the few at that gruesome and bloody scene who recognized the truth about Jesus was the Roman centurion, a pagan, who exclaimed, “Truly, this Man was the Son of God!” Mark 15:39.  The other notable witness was the thief who was converted at pretty much the last minute, Luke 23:42.

_______________

Four men.

Unlikely men.

God used them.

God can use us.

Linen.  Blue.  Purple.  Scarlet.

Four colors.

Four Gospels.

One message.

One Savior.

“Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved,” Acts 16:31.

The Way In

The width of the court on the east side shall be fifty cubits.  The hanging on one side of the gate shall be fifteen cubits, with their three pillars and their three sockets.  And on the other side shall be hangings of fifteen cubits, with their three pillars and their three  sockets.

“For the gate of the court there shall be a screen twenty cubits long, woven of blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine woven linen, made by a weaver.  It shall have four pillars and four sockets.  All the pillars around the court shall have bands of silver; their hooks shall be of silver and their sockets of bronze, Exodus 27:13-17.

“The hangings of one side of the gate were fifteen cubits long, with their three pillars and their three sockets, and the same for the other side of the court gate; and this side and that were hangings of fifteen cubits, with their three pillars and their three sockets.

The screen for the gate of the court was woven of blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and of fine woven linen.  The length was twenty cubits, and the height along its width was five cubits, corresponding to the hangings of the court.  And there were four pillars with their sockets of bronze; their hooks were of silver, and the overlay of their capitals and their bands was silver, Exodus 38:14-15, 18-19.

Our last post was about the fact that there was only one entrance into the tabernacle courtyard, which foreshadowed the teaching of our Lord that He is the entrance into heaven and the presence of God.  This is in stark contrast to the current idea that there are many roads into heaven; that we all serve the same god in our own way.  There was only one entrance into the tabernacle; there is only one entrance into the presence of God.  And we serve God His way or not at all.

Our Israelite has approached the tabernacle grounds, but the linen fence is in his way.  He has to go around to the east side, to the gate, to the entrance.

Though we’re not given a detailed description of the gate, I believe it was beautiful.  It was thirty feet long, of fine white linen embroidered with blue and purple and scarlet thread.  I don’t know that I’ve ever really thought about it before, and we’re not given a lot of information, but I don’t believe the embroidery was mere outline figures.  I believe the gate was a rich tapestry, as befitting its role as the way into the presence of God.

We are given some instructions about the curtains which make up the tabernacle itself.  In Exodus 26:1, God instructed Moses,

“Moreover you shall make the tabernacle with ten curtains of fine woven linen and blue, purple, and scarlet thread; with artistic designs of cherubim you shall weave them.”

Exodus 26:21, “You shall make a veil woven of blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine white linen.  It shall be woven with an artistic design of cherubim.”

Perhaps the same motif was used on the entrance screen.  Cherubim are associated with the presence of God, who in several places in Scripture is said to dwell between the cherubim, 2 Samuel 6:2; 2 Kings 19:15; 1 Chronicles 13:6; Psalm 80:1; Psalm 99:1; Isaiah 37:16.  These extensive references show how ingrained the idea was of the presence of God with these creatures.

The first reference to cherubim is found in Genesis 3:24, where God placed cherubim at the east end of the garden of Eden, and a flaming sword which turned every way, to guard the way to the tree of life.

Here they are associated with God’s judgment against Adam and Eve.  Some have thought that the cherubim were there to keep the way open, but it seems to me that they were there to make sure the way to the tree of life was closed, v, 22, and, therefore, no longer accessible.  This prevented the guilty couple from eating of the tree and confirming themselves in their fallen and lost state forever.  It was perhaps as much an act of mercy as it was an act of judgment.

As a foreshadowing of the Lord Jesus, what does the gate tell us?

There were four elements which made up the gate:  the white linen itself and the three colors of thread used to decorate it.

The linen was the foundation for the whole thing.  We’ve already seen that white linen is a symbol of righteousness, Revelation 19:8.  The linen speaks to the fact that Christ is holy, harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, Hebrews 7:26.  He is without blemish, a strict requirement, mentioned numerous times in Leviticus, for the animal sacrifices which prefigured His sacrifice.

The color always mentioned first is blue.  Blue is the color of the sky, and speaks to our Lord’s heavenly and divine origin. In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God, John 1:1.  According to 1 Corinthians 15:47, He is the Lord from heaven. Before His birth, the angel announced to His mother, Mary, “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow you; therefore, also, that Holy One who is to be born will be called the Son of God,”  Luke 1:36.  “Son” by nature and character, not just by relationship.

The next color, for we take it out of order, is scarlet, or red.  Red speaks of the earth.  The soil in Israel is red, or so I’ve read.  I’ve not had the privilege of visiting there.  This represents the true humanity of our Lord.  That which was born of the virgin Mary was human, truly human, fully human – apart from sin.  Sin has nothing to do with being human, though now, because of Adam and Eve, it is a sad part of us.

Our Lord as God was in the beginning with God from eternity, but at a point in time, determined by the Father, the fulness of time, Galatians 4:4, He became flesh, John 1:14.  Notice the distinction:  He was God; He became flesh.  Nowhere does Scripture ever say that He became God, as some cults will try to tell you.

The last color is purple.  Purple is a result of combining blue and red, and speaks to the dual nature of our Lord.  He is truly God, but He is also and just as much truly Man.  He is the God-Man! Theologians, skeptics and cultists may discuss and dispute and argue about this, but the Scripture is clear.  He is God.  He is man.

Purple is also the color of royalty.  He is King of Kings and Lord of Lords.  There is much discussion about what this means.  One day, there will be no doubt.

One final thought.  Red is also the color of blood.  This speaks to the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus Christ.  Without His death, His birth has no meaning, no reason.  He came to die.  At the beginning of His ministry, He was called the Lamb of God, John 1:29, 36.  Easter is just a few days away.  We celebrate His resurrection.  But His resurrection says that He died first.

He died in order that folks like us might live.  The perfect Man died for imperfect sinners.  Paul put it like this in 2 Corinthians 5:21, For He made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.

He became what He was not, in order that we might be made what we are not.

There is one final thought.  Twice in His instructions, God referred to the linen in the gate as made by a weaver.  Since we’ve been looking at these things for spiritual instruction, what does this mean?

Our Lord was God incarnate, God-in-the-flesh.  As such, as we’ve seen above, He was holy, harmless, undefiled….  He lived a perfect, sinless life for about 33 years.  He kept every precept of the Law and never once failed in word, thought or deed.  By doing this, as someone has put it, He obtained a righteousness that He didn’t need; He was already righteous.  It was a “made” righteousness, as it were, and became available for others.  The Lord never needed it; we certainly do.  Those who come to Him by faith and receive Him as Savior become the righteousness of God in Him. People look to the “merits” of the saints in order to get them into Heaven.  My friend, all such hope is false; there’s only ever been One who had any “merit” to begin with, let alone have any “left over” for others.

That is why, in the words of Isaiah 45:22, Christ says, “Look to Me, and be saved, All you ends of the earth!  For I am God, and there is other.”  (emphasis added)

The Ark of the Covenant

“And they shall make an ark of acacia wood…,” Exodus 25:10 (NKJV).

There are two main sections dealing with the construction of the tabernacle.  In Exodus 25-31, God gives instruction concerning the various parts of the tabernacle and of the priesthood that would minister there.  In Exodus 35-39, we read of the actual preparation for and construction of the tabernacle.

Though the rest of the posts will look at the tabernacle from the standpoint of an Israelite who was approaching it, this post will look at the first item God told Moses to make:  a piece of furniture called “the ark of the covenant.”

It’s interesting to me that, in these instructions, God begins with Himself, for the ark signified the place where He would “dwell” and where He would meet with Israel.

So it always is.

God begins with Himself.

It was that way with this planet:  In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth, Genesis 1:1.  The earth didn’t create itself, or develop from some lesser thing, in spite of the best efforts of those who would tell us otherwise.

It was that way with Abraham.  He didn’t sit down one day and decide to write down his thoughts about the possibility of “a higher power.”  Genesis 12 and Hebrews 11:8 tells us that God appeared to Abraham and told him to move to “a land that I will show you,” Genesis 12:1.

It was that way with Israel and the giving of the Law, Exodus 20.  They didn’t get together and write down some ideas for how they would govern themselves.  In Exodus 20, God called Moses to the top of a mountain and gave him The Ten Commandments, though these are only a summary of the Law, there being a lot more that God gave Israel before He was done.

And it’s that way with us.  Scripture says that God chose us in Him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before Him, Ephesians 1:4.  I can’t think of another subject that will make people angry more quickly than the idea that God chose us simply because He wanted to.  I’ve dealt with this at length elsewhere on this blog.  Let me just say here that if He hadn’t chosen us, we would never “choose” Him, would never be saved.  There are some folks who focus on “whosoever will.”  That’s alright; it’s a Biblical concept.  The problem is that, apart from the grace of God, we’re all “whosoever won’ts”.

Folks want to get around this by saying that God “looked down the corridors of time for those who would ‘accept Him’, and chose them on that basis.”  Is that how He did it?  Scripture itself uses this idea of God “looking”:
The LORD looks down from heaven upon the children of men,
To see if there are any who understand, who seek God,
Psalm 14:2.
If the “foreknowledge” folks were right, the Psalmist would continue that God did see some who “understand,” who “seek” Him.

Is that what the Psalmist wrote?

Not in the least.

They have all turned aside,
They have together become corrupt;

There is none who does good,
No, not one, Psalm 14:3, emphasis added.

It begins with God.

Because it would never begin with us.

The ark of the covenant was a chest of wood, covered with gold, Exodus 25:10.  It was a little less than four feet long and a little more than two feet wide and high.  Except for the high priest once a year, no one ever saw it because it was kept in the holy of holies in the tabernacle.  Even when Israel moved during its wilderness journeys, it was covered to keep it from prying eyes.  I don’t think God was “hiding,” but, rather, was impressing on Israel the seriousness of their relationship with Him.  Indeed, when an Israelite touched the ark during of these moves, God struck him dead, 2 Samuel 6:6; 1 Chronicles 13:9.  I think there might be a lesson for us with our comfortable, casual, contemporary Christianity.  I know that a suit and tie don’t guarantee spirituality, but neither do flip-flops and shorts.

There were three items kept inside the ark:  the golden pot that had the manna, Aaron’s rod that budded, and the tablets of the covenant, Hebrews 9:4.  Exodus 13:33 tells of the pot of manna, which was to be kept to show future generations of Israelites how God had provided for Israel during her wilderness travels.  Aaron’s rod reminded Israel that the descendants of Aaron and they alone, could perform the office of priest, Numbers 17.   The tables of the covenant were the original tablets that Moses had brought down from Mount Sinai, Exodus 20.

Lord willing, we’ll consider this “covenant” more closely in our next post.

“Taking The Offering”

Then the LORD spoke to Moses, saying:  “Speak to the children of Israel, that they bring Me an offering.  From everyone who gives it willingly with his heart you shall take My offering.  And this is the offering which you shall take from them:  gold, silver, and bronze; blue, purple, and scarlet thread, fine linen and goats’ hair; ram skins dyed red, badger skins, and acacia wood; oil for the light, and spices for the anointing oil and for the sweet incense; onyx stones, and stones to be set in the ephod and in the breastplate.  And let them make Me a sanctuary, that I may dwell among them.”  Exodus 25:1-8 NKJV

This is the second post in the series on the Tabernacle, a building which was central to Israel’s covenant relationship with God from shortly after she was redeemed from Egypt until the reign of Solomon.  The Tabernacle was the second most important building in Israel’s history, surpassed and replaced only by the Temple built by Solomon centuries later and was the focal point of Israel’s relationship with and worship of God.  It was the meeting place between God and man.

Instructions for the Tabernacle and the details of its construction are found in Exodus.

Its importance may be seen in a couple of things.

1. The amount of space devoted to it.

About 50 chapters are given to it, either wholly or in part.

2. Four chapters in Hebrews teach us something of its meaning, especially of the priesthood and sacrifices.  The writer of Hebrews told us that he could have written more about the building itself, Hebrews 9:5, but he was concerned mainly with pointing us to the Lord Jesus and His once and only sacrifice for sins.

In the verses before us, we note –

1. the origin of the plans for the tabernacle, v. 1.
2. the offering of materials for the tabernacle, vs. 2-9.

1. the origin of the plans for the tabernacle, v. 1,
And the LORD spoke to Moses.

Moses didn’t dream this up on his own.  Nor did the LORD ask him for his opinion, his input or any thoughts he might have on the matter.  No, no.  God told him that this was what He wanted him to do.

I think we could learn something from this.  I was privileged to go to Bible College.  I’m thankful for that experience.  Because of it, I’m sitting here, married, writing this post.  Granted, the water has flowed under a lot of bridges since then, but it was a starting place.  The thing is, we studied a lot of books about the Bible, but little from the Bible itself.  Now, I understand the importance of “books” and that men write down their knowledge and wisdom from the Scripture.  After all, that’s what this blog is.  But I pray that it isn’t just about my knowledge or wisdom.  My goal is always to be guided by the question, “What does the Scripture say?” Romans 4:3, emphasis added.

It’s a sad fact that only a small portion of professing Christians faithfully read the Bible.  Granted, there’s a lot there.  And much of it is about times and customs which might be strange, perhaps even repugnant, to us.  Nevertheless.  Let me encourage you.  Read the Bible through, then read it again.  And again.  Even if you only read one chapter a day, that’s one chapter more than many.  And as you read faithfully, it will begin to come together for you.  This doesn’t deny the necessity of the Spirit’s enabling us to understand; He won’t work if there is no effort on our part.  You feed your body every day.  Please, feed your soul.

This brings us to

2. the offering of materials for the tabernacle, vs. 2-9.

First, it was to be a willing offering.

This was not to be compulsory, like the tithe.

Second, it was a designated offering.

Though voluntary, there was only certain things to be offered.

Third, it was a reminder, “My offering.”

That is, not only was it an offering to the Lord; it was a reminder to the Israelite of where he had gotten the items from in the first place.  Cf. David’s prayer as he commissioned his son Solomon to build the Temple.  In 1 Chronicles, and speaking to God, he said,

“Who am I, and who are my people,
That we should be able to offer so willingly as this?

For all things come from You,
And of Your own we have given You.”

That last phrase could be translated, “Of Your own hand we have given You.”  Concerning this idea, Moses commanded Israel, “And you shall remember the Lord your God, for it is He who gives you power to get wealth…,” Deuteronomy 8:18, emphasis added.

Since the tabernacle speaks so eloquently of the person and work of the Lord Jesus, we want to think about how each of these materials might foreshadow Him.

a. gold, silver, bronze, v. 3.

These were very expensive and precious.

I Peter 2:6, 7, Therefore it is also contained in the Scripture, “Behold, I lay in Zion A chief cornerstone, elect, precious, And he who believes in him shall not ashamed.  Therefore, to you who believe, he is precious,” emphases added.  To me, the glory of heaven won’t be the streets of gold or the pearly gates; it will be that the Lord Jesus is there.  His presence will make a hovel glorious.  His absence makes a mansion insignificant.

b. blue, purple and scarlet thread, fine linen and goats’ hair, v. 4.

“Blue” speaks of His heavenly origin.
“Purple” speaks of His royalty.
“Scarlet” speaks of His sacrifice for sins.
“Fine linen” speaks of His righteousness.
“Goats’ hair” speaks of His “ordinariness”.  He wasn’t born in a palace, but in a stable.  He didn’t live among the privileged of His day, but among ordinary folk.  The common people heard Him gladly, Mark 12:37.  Rulers rejected Him.

c. rams’ skin dyed red, badger skins, and acacia wood, v. 5.

“Rams’ skins dyed red” speaks of the shedding of His blood.  Rams were one of the few animals accepted for the Israelite to sacrifice.  For the believer, the Lord Jesus is the only acceptable sacrifice.
“Badger skins” speaks of His permanence.  There’s some discussion about how this word in the original should be translated.  Some might translate it as “dolphin”.  Dolphin skin would be waterproof and would last.  The word might also refer to protection.  Dolphin skin would protect the tabernacle from the rain.  The LORD protects His people so that even death cannot ultimately harm them.
“Acacia Wood” speaks of His indestructibility.  Acacia wood was extremely durable.  After 2000 years of unbelievers and skeptics doing their worst, the Lord Jesus still has those who believe in and follow Him.  If He tarries another 2000 years, He will have those who believe in and follow Him.

d. oil for the light, and spices for the anointing oil and for the sweet incense, v. 6.

Olive oil was used to provide light in the tabernacle.  This speaks to us of the ministry of the Spirit as He shed the light of the Gospel into our hearts and minds, “For it is the God who commanded the light to shine out of the darkness, who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the fact of Jesus Christ, 1 Corinthians 4:6.  Without that ministry of the Spirit, for all our religion and learning, we remain in darkness.

Spices were used both in the anointing oil and in sweet incense.  This wasn’t just for the sake of pretty smells, but to cover the odor of death that permeated the area around the bronze altar and that came from the continual application of blood to it.  In fact, it was forbidden to make incense simply to smell it.  Exodus 30:37, 38 says, “But as for the incense you shall make, you shall not make any for yourselves, according to its composition.  It shall be to you holy to the LORD.  Whoever makes any like it, to smell it, he shall be cut off from his people.”

The altar of incense was inside the tabernacle, next to the veil which separated the holy place from the most holy place.  The most holy place contained the Ark of the covenant and the mercy seat, where God spoke to His people.  The placement of the altar tells us that, apart from the Lord Jesus, there is no access into the presence of God.  It is significant that Scripture tells us that when Christ died, the veil of the Temple, which succeeded the tabernacle and which, we are told, was several inches thick, was torn in two from top to bottom, Matthew 27:51; Mark 15:38; Luke 23:45.  The fact that three Gospels record this incident emphasizes its importance.  Only Matthew and Mark record that it was torn from the top down.  Only God could tear that curtain.  Only the Lord Jesus can atone for sin and open the way to God.  Did He not say, “I am the way, the truth and the life.  No man comes to the Father except through Me” John 14:6?

There are innumerable religions and churches, many roads to religion.  There is only one road to heaven.

Which road are you on?